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Events in Art and Archaeology

Opening of Bechtler Museum of Modern Art
CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA  •  Bechtler Museum of Modern Art,  •  2 January 2010 - 2 January 2015
 
The museum is named after the family of Andreas Bechtler, a Charlotte resident and native of Switzerland who inherited and assembled a collection of more than 1,400 artworks created by major figures of 20th-century modernism. He donated the collection to the public trust. The Bechtler collection reflects most of the important art movements and schools from the 20th century with a deep holding of the School of Paris.

The collection comprises artworks by seminal figures such as Alberto Giacometti, Joan Miro, Jean Tinguely, Max Ernst, Andy Warhol, Alexander Calder, Le Corbusier, Sol LeWitt, Edgar Degas, Nicolas de Stael, Barbara Hepworth and Picasso.

The 35,600-square-foot Bechtler museum building was designed by the Swiss architect  Mario Botta.



Bechtler Museum of Modern Art


Please click here for a Culturekiosque article on the opening of the Bechtler Museum of Modern Art in Charlotte, North Carolina.

Contact: Bechtler Museum of Modern Art
420 South Tryon Street
Charlotte, North Carolina
Tel: (1) 704 353 92 00

Between Mountains and Sea: Arts of the Ancient Andes
AUSTIN, TEXAS  •  The Blanton Museum of Art  •  1 February - 17 August 2014
 

The Blanton Museum of Art, in partnership with the Department of Art and Art History at The University of Texas at Austin, presents a special selection of objects that illuminate the lifestyle, technological achievements, and ideology of pre-Inka cultures among the coastal Andes of South America. Between Mountains and Sea: Arts of the Ancient Andes features 80 works drawn primarily from the University’s collections with loans from the Dallas Museum of Art, ranging from intricately woven textiles to painted ceramic vessels and modeled effigies. 

Nasca Culture, Peru, (100 BCE - 600 CE) Bowl with profile birds
Nasca Culture, Peru, Early Intermediate Period (100 BCE - 600 CE)
Bowl with profile birds Ceramic, slip paints
Department of Art and Art History, College of Fine Arts, The University of Texas at Austin

The exhibition traces the artistic development of the ancient Paracas, Nasca, Wari, Moche, Chancay, Sicán, and Chimú cultures from the Early Horizon (900–200 BCE) through the Late Horizon (1470–1532 CE) periods.

The Pacific coast of South America is home to environmental extremes, where the narrow but stark desert coastline is striped by fertile river valleys, whose abundance depends on the towering highland peaks for rains, springs, and water runoff. Mountains and sea thus frame the desert coast, marking environmental, ecological, and economic contrasts that have prompted complex networks of production and trade throughout Andean cultural history.

The coastal Andean societies devised both technological and ideological means to tackle their precarious dependence on water for agricultural production. Through the vivid colors and refined modeling of their ceramic vessels and woven textiles, viewers understand the ideas, personae, and performances addressing such concerns. Perhaps one of the most well-known, the Nasca culture (100 BCE – 600 CE) created vast geoglyphs in the desert pampa known as “Nazca lines.” Among various possible functions, these immense earthworks may have indicated regions possessing or void of underground water channels. Historical photographs of these expansive figural and geometric designs will be included in the exhibition. They bear close connection to the images decorating vibrant polychrome Nasca ceramic vessels, which retain their remarkable brilliance after 1500 years.

Arguably the most prolific of Andean visual cultures, the Moche (100–800 CE) on the North coast of Peru excelled in ceramic arts, using the medium to portray ritual, regalia, performance, and power. Moche ceramicists blended modeling and mold-making, painting, and relief to illustrate dramatic scenes of warfare and sacrifice, agricultural production, and fertility. The Moche approached stark realism in portraiture of male warriors, as well as in animal and plant representations.



The Blanton Museum of Art Website


Contact:

Blanton Museum of Art
The University of Texas at Austin
200 E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.
Austin, Texas 78701


Tel: (1) 512 471 73 24

<DIV style="LEFT: -99999px; POSITION: absolute">Carrie Mae Weems, An Anthropological Debate (from From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried), 1995–96. Chromogenic print with etched text on glass, 26 1/2 x 22 3/4 in. © 2012, MoMA, NY.More Information: <A href="http://artdaily.com/">http://artdaily.com/[/url]Copyright © <B>artdaily.org</B></A></DIV> • <DIV style="LEFT: -99999px; POSITION: absolute">Carrie Mae Weems, An Anthropological Debate (from From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried), 1995–96. Chromogenic print with etched text on glass, 26 1/2 x 22 3/4 in. © 2012, MoMA, NY.More Information: <A href="http://artdaily.com/">http://artdaily.com/[/url]Copyright © <B>artdaily.org</B></A></DIV> • <DIV style="LEFT: -99999px; POSITION: absolute">Carrie Mae Weems, An Anthropological Debate (from From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried), 1995–96. Chromogenic print with etched text on glass, 26 1/2 x 22 3/4 in. © 2012, MoMA, NY.More Information: <A href="http://artdaily.com/">http://artdaily.com/[/url]Copyright © <B>artdaily.org</B></A></DIV> • <P>Carrie Mae Weems: An Anthropological Debate (from From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried), 1995–96Chromogenic print with etched text on glass26 1/2 x 22 3/4 in.© 2012, MoMA, NY.</P>
Carrie Mae Weems, An Anthropological Debate (from From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried), 1995–96. Chromogenic print with etched text on glass, 26 1/2 x 22 3/4 in. © 2012, MoMA, NY.

More Information: http://artdaily.com/[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org
Carrie Mae Weems, An Anthropological Debate (from From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried), 1995–96. Chromogenic print with etched text on glass, 26 1/2 x 22 3/4 in. © 2012, MoMA, NY.

More Information: http://artdaily.com/[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org
Carrie Mae Weems, An Anthropological Debate (from From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried), 1995–96. Chromogenic print with etched text on glass, 26 1/2 x 22 3/4 in. © 2012, MoMA, NY.

More Information: http://artdaily.com/[/url]
Copyright © artdaily.org

Carrie Mae Weems: An Anthropological Debate (from From Here I Saw What Happened and I Cried), 1995–96
Chromogenic print with etched text on glass
26 1/2 x 22 3/4 in.
© 2012, MoMA, NY.

Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video
NEW YORK  •  Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum  •  24 January - 14 May 2014
 

Born and raised in Portland, Oregon, Carrie Mae Weems is internationally recognized for her photography-based art that investigates issues of race, gender, and societal class. Carrie Mae Weems: Three Decades of Photography and Video presents more than 200 photographs, videos, and installations tracing the evolution of Weems’ career.

Carrie Mae Weems was introduced to photography in the late 1970s after working as a professional modern dancer and grassroots political activist in California.  She was attracted to the medium because of its ability to give tangible, visual form to abstract political and social theories, particularly those related to African American experiences.  Weems is also a poetic storyteller; powerful written or spoken-word narratives often accompany her images.  In her earliest work, the artist looked to her own life and family as case studies for exploring contemporary African American identity.  Weems’s narrative soon broadened to more general aspects of the African Diaspora, from the legacy of slavery to the perpetuation of both debilitating stereotypes and nourishing folk traditions.  A desire to more deeply examine the underlying causes and effects of social injustice spurred Weems to explore the histories of Africa, Europe, and the Caribbean, as well as the southeastern United States.

An illustrated exhibition catalogue is available.



Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Website


Contact: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 5th Avenue (at 89th Street)
New York, NY

Tel: (1) 212 423 35 00

Christopher Williams: <EM>Mustafa Kinte (Gambia) / Camera: Makina 67 506347 / Plaubel Feinmechanik und Optik GmbH / Borsigallee 37 / 60388 Frankfurt am Main, Germany / Shirt: Van Laack Shirt</EM> Kent 64 / 41061 Mönchengladbach, Germany / Dirk Schaper Studio, Berlin / July 20, 2007, 2008. Restricted gift of Artworkers Retirement Society© Christopher WilliamsCourtesy of the artist; David Zwirner, New York/London; and Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne.
Christopher Williams: Mustafa Kinte (Gambia) / Camera: Makina 67 506347 / Plaubel Feinmechanik und Optik GmbH / Borsigallee 37 / 60388 Frankfurt am Main, Germany / Shirt: Van Laack Shirt Kent 64 / 41061 Mönchengladbach, Germany / Dirk Schaper Studio, Berlin / July 20, 2007, 2008.
Restricted gift of Artworkers Retirement Society
© Christopher Williams
Courtesy of the artist; David Zwirner, New York/London; and Galerie Gisela Capitain, Cologne.
Christopher Williams: The Production Line of Happiness
CHICAGO  •  The Art Institute of Chicago  •  24 January - 18 May 2014
 
With a career spanning 35 years, Christopher Williams (born 1956) now stands as one of the leading contemporary artists engaged in photography. . Deeply invested in the techniques and history of photography, Williams is just as profoundly committed to contemporary art as a forum for intellectual inquiry and thoughtful opposition—resisting, for example, a capitalist society in which photographs typically act as agents of consumer spectacle. This exhibition—a multipart installation conceived by the artist that spans three gallery spaces on three floors of the museum—is Williams’s first retrospective.

The survey begins with films from Williams’s studies at the California Institute of the Arts, where he earned his MFA in 1981 and took classes with John Baldessari and Michael Asher. Alongside the films and SOURCE (1981), Williams’s first mature work, is a classic early piece, Angola to Vietnam* (1989), shown in its 27-part entirety, as well as works of the 1990s, mainly from For Example: Die Welt ist schön (1993–2001), an eight-year project inspired in part by the 1920s photographs of Albert Renger-Patzsch.

The Art Institute of Chicago Website


Contact: The Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60603-6110
Tel: (1) 312 443 36 00

Garry Winogrand: <EM>Metropolitan Opera, New York, ca. 1951</EM>Gelatin silver printGarry Winogrand Archive, Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona© The Estate of Garry WinograndCourtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
Garry Winogrand: Metropolitan Opera, New York, ca. 1951
Gelatin silver print
Garry Winogrand Archive, Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona
© The Estate of Garry Winogrand
Courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco
Garry Winogrand
WASHINGTON, DC  •  National Gallery of Art  •  2 March - 8 June 2014
 

The first retrospective in 25 years of work by artist Garry Winogrand (1928–1984) — the renowned photographer of New York City and of American life from the 1950s through the early 1980s — brings together the artist's most iconic images with newly printed photographs from his largely unexamined archive of late  work, brings together the artist's most iconic images with newly printed photographs from his largely unexamined archive of late work. 

More than 300 photographs in the exhibition and more than 400 in the accompanying catalogue attempt to create a portrait of Garry Winogrand — a chronicler of postwar America.

After serving in the military as a weather forecaster, Winogrand first began working as a photographer while studying painting on the G.I. Bill at Columbia University (1948–51).

The Bronx-born Winogr was enormously prolific but largely postponed the editing and printing of his work. Dying suddenly at the age of 56, he left behind approximately 6,500 rolls of film (some 250,000 images) that he had never seen, as well as proof sheets from his earlier years that he had marked but never printed. Roughly half of the photographs in the exhibition have never been exhibited or published until now; over 100 have never before been printed.

Winogrand photographed business moguls, everyday women on the street, famous actors and athletes, hippies, rodeos, politicians, soldiers, animals in zoos, car culture, airports, and antiwar demonstrators and the construction workers who beat them bloody in view of the unmoved police.

The exhibition catalogue Garry Winogrand (448 pages; $85 hardcover; $50 softcover)—published by SFMOMA in association with Yale University Press serves as the most comprehensive volume on Winogrand to date and the only compendium of the artist's work.  Five new essays and nearly 400 plates trace the artist's working methods and major themes.

After Washington, D.C., Garry Winogrand travels to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (27 June through 21 September 2014); the Jeu de Paume, Paris (14 October 2014 through 25 January 2015); and the Fundacion MAPFRE, Madrid (3 March through 10 May 2015).



National Gallery of Art Website


Contact:

National Gallery of Art
6th Street and Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC


Tel: (1) 202 737 42 15

François Boucher (1703–1770): <EM>Recumbent Female Nude</EM>, circa 1742–43Red, white, and black chalk on cream antique laid paperThe Horvitz Collection, Boston
François Boucher (1703–1770): Recumbent Female Nude, circa 1742–43
Red, white, and black chalk on cream antique laid paper
The Horvitz Collection, Boston
Genius and Grace: François Boucher and the Generation of 1700,
CINCINNATI, OHIO  •  Cincinnati Art Museum  •  14 February - 11 May 2014
 
François Boucher, Charles-Joseph Natoire, Carle Vanloo and their contemporaries, born in or around 1700, executed virtuoso compositions whose refined elegance epitomizes the French grand manner. Along with Boucher, Natoire, and Vanloo, the exhibition also celebrates lesser known but equally talented figures such as Louis-Gabriel Blanchet and Joseph Francois Parrocel, as well as several pastels, including a rare example by Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin. More than seventy master drawings, many of which have never before exhibited or published, are on view.

Cincinnati Art Museum Website


Contact: Cincinnati Art Museum
953 Eden Park Drive
Cincinnati, OH 4520
Tel: (1) 877 472 42 26

Hiroshi Sugimoto: <EM>Polar Bear</EM>, 1976Gelatin silver printThe J. Paul Getty Museum, purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council© Hiroshi Sugimoto
Hiroshi Sugimoto: Polar Bear, 1976
Gelatin silver print
The J. Paul Getty Museum, purchased with funds provided by the Photographs Council
© Hiroshi Sugimoto
Hiroshi Sugimoto: Past Tense
LOS ANGELES  •  The Getty Center  •  4 February - 8 June 2014
 
Since the mid-1970s, Hiroshi Sugimoto (born 1948) has used photography to investigate how history filters down to the present. This exhibition brings together three series by the artist—habitat dioramas, wax portraits, and early photographic negatives—that present objects of historical and cultural significance from various museum collections.

The Getty Center Website


Contact:

The Getty Center
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, California 90049



Tel: (1) 310 440 73 00

Italian Futurism, 1909–1944: Reconstructing the Universe
NEW YORK  •  Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum  •  21 February - 1 September 2014
 
This multidisciplinary exhibition examines the historical sweep of the movement from its inception with F. T. Marinetti’s Futurist manifesto in 1909 through its demise at the end of World War II. Presenting over 300 works executed between 1909 and 1944, the chronological exhibition encompasses not only painting and sculpture, but also architecture, design, ceramics, fashion, film, photography, advertising, free-form poetry, publications, music, theater, and performance. To convey the myriad artistic languages employed by the Futurists as they evolved over a 35-year period, the exhibition integrates multiple disciplines in each section.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Website


Contact: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
1071 Fifth Avenue
(at 89th Street)
New York, NY 10128-0173

Tel: (1) 212 423 35 87

Mike Kelley: <EM>Banana Man Costume</EM>, 1981Courtesy Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts
Mike Kelley: Banana Man Costume, 1981
Courtesy Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts
Mike Kelley
LOS ANGELES  •  Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles  •  23 March - 28 July 2014
 

Found dead of an apparent suicide at his home in Pasadena, California in January 2012,  the American artist Mike Kelley (born in 1954 in Detroit) left behind him a prolific and disturbing body of work, which draws on both learned and popular culture. 

Brought up in a working-class, Roman Catholic milieu, the influential American artist was only 57 at the time of his death. He was represented by Gagosian Gallery in New York.

Seen frist  at the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and then the  Centre Pompidou in Paris, the exhibition is built around the highlights of the artist's production. Large installations are contrasted with collections of more intimate works, particularly on paper, from European and American collections. From the first performances by the artist at CalArts, the famous art school in Los Angeles, to his surprisingly rich graphic work and spectacular installation sculptures, for which he uses a huge variety of techniques (video, photographs, motley objects, etc.), Mike Kelley's intellectual, yet also slightly irreverent, work unfolds in a gripping visual and auditory journey.



Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA) Website


Contact:  Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles
250 South Grand Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90012

Tel: 1) 213 621 17 41

<SPAN class=pie _extended="true">Romare Bearden: <EM>Baptism</EM>, 1975 (detail)Serigraph on paper36.5 x 49 inches paperEdition of 50</SPAN>
Romare Bearden: Baptism, 1975 (detail)
Serigraph on paper
36.5 x 49 inches paper
Edition of 50
Romare Bearden: Storyteller
SAN FRANCISCO  •  Jenkins Johnson Gallery  •  3 April - 21 June 2014
 

The exhibition features collages, watercolors, and prints from the 1970s and 1980s by Romare Bearden, a descendant of the Harlem Renaissance, a great storyteller, and a master colorist. Romare Bearden (1911-1988), an author, visual artist, songwriter, and jazz aficionado, is recognized as one the most creative and important artists of the 20th century, even spurring a centennial celebration at dozens of national museum including the Studio Museum in Harlem. Migrating from Charlotte, North Carolina to New York when he was a toddler, Bearden quickly became part of the cultural fabric of New York City. His family’s house was a meeting place for major figures of the Harlem Renaissance, including writer and social activist Langston Hughes and Bearden’s second cousin and early patron Duke Ellington.  A member of the Harlem Artist Guild and founding member of the civil rights group The Spiral, as well as of the Studio Museum in Harlem, Romare Bearden played a key role in the evolution of black arts and culture throughout the 20th century.

Bearden’s collages in Storyteller — including mural maquettes, an Olympic poster, and a book jacket for a collection of poems by African writers — highlight the artist’s mastery of the medium for which he is most remembered. Intended for public spaces and distribution, these collages symbolize the reach of Bearden’s artwork and his legacy. His approach to collage, as seen in this exhibition, was improvisational, intuitive, and inventive, not unlike the creative process of jazz and blues that tends to evolve somewhat spontaneously. Bearden considered his collages to be paintings and once said of them that “any reproduction will suit my purpose, because, like the ancient makers of mosaics, I’m really drawing and painting with…paper.”
In addition to collage, Storyteller features watercolors, monotypes, and prints.

Prints based on his collages are showcased in his Odyssey series, which illustrates Homer’s epic poem; the series seemingly departs from his best-known work of edgy urban and jazz scenes or his depictions of African American life in the rural South. Yet, because Bearden depicts these Greek mythological figures as black, he invites a comparison between classical myth and African American culture. Viewers may liken the Greek king Odysseus’ arduous and heroic ten-year search for home after the Trojan War to African American struggles. Replacing white characters with black figures, Bearden attempts to defeat the rigidness of racial roles and stereotypes and open up the possibilities and potentials of blacks. Bearden says about this series and his work in general, "What I tried to do is take the elements of African American life….and place it in a universal framework."



Jenkins Johnson Gallery Website


Contact: Jenkins Johnson Gallery
464 Sutter Street
San Francisco, CA  94108
Tel: (1) 415 677 07 70

When the Greeks Ruled Egypt
CHICAGO  •  The Art Institute of Chicago  •  31 October 2013 - 27 July 2014
 

Alexander the Great seized Egypt on his mission to conquer the Persian Empire in 332 B.C.; when his general Ptolemy came to rule Egypt, he found it wise to adapt to the much older culture. His dynasty, which ruled for the subsequent 300 years.

When the Greeks Ruled Egypt begins with a range of works created in the 3,000 years before the arrival of Alexander the Great in Egypt. Centered on the belief of a real and tactile afterlife that mirrored life on earth, sculptors, painters, goldsmiths, scribes, glassmakers, and architects created beautiful funerary goods to serve rich and poor in eternity. Religious belief that had changed very little in over three millennia meant artwork was remarkably consistent and abided by time-honored traditions that carried forward the distinctive visual culture of past generations, including the iconic Egyptian convention of representing the human body.

Wall Fragment from the Tomb of Thenti (Egyptian, Old Kingdom, Dynasty 5, 2504–2347 B.C.) is just such a representation that simultaneously depicts the frontal and side views of the body; the eye and shoulders are frontal while the head, nose, and mouth are shown in profile. Other artworks show meat, vegetables, vessels full of libations, and inventories of linen to assure abundance for the deceased in life after death. To ensure protection in the afterlife, Egyptians stocked their tombs with security-giving amulets and figurines like the Ushabti of Nebseni (at left; Egyptian, New Kingdom, early Dynasty 17, about 1570 B.C.), which were thought to act as helpful servants.

The exhibition moves from such representative Egyptian expressions to the intermingling of artistic traditions under Alexander the Great and his successor in Egypt, Ptolemy. The Greek rulers in Egypt claimed kinship with the Greek Zeus and the Egyptian Amon and also invented a totally new god, Serapis, who oversaw Egyptian grain production so crucial to Greeks and later, the Romans. The exhibition showcases the fusion of two artistic traditions with works that incorporate the Classical (Greek and Roman) interest in naturalism with millennia-old Egyptian practices. Reliefs from the Ptolemaic period in When the Greeks Ruled Egypt show subjects that are traditionally Egyptian, yet subtly introduce the true-to-life style of the Ptolemies. New coinage, modeled on Greek standard weights, used classical imagery but with Egyptian characteristics like the ram’s horn of Zeus Amon curled around the ears of the rulers depicted.



The exhibition also includes works from the Roman period, which began in 30 B.C. after Octavian’s defeat of Mark Antony and Cleopatra, the last actively ruling pharaoh of the Ptolemaic dynasty. Mummy portraits painted during Roman rule adhere to Roman tastes for realistic portraiture, but indicate how assimilated into Egyptian life some Greeks and Romans became by practicing mummification, albeit with the slight variation of a portrait as face cover.



The Art Institute of Chicago Website


Contact: The Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60603-6110

Tel: (1) 312 443 36 00

Ileana Sonnabend: Ambassador for the New
NEW YORK  •  The Museum of Modern Art  •  21 December 2013 - 21 April 2014
 

Considered by many to be among the greatest gallerists of late 20th century contemporary art, Ileana Sonnabend (1914–2007) helped shape the course of postwar art in Europe and North America. Sonnabend was instrumental in introducing American Pop art and Minimalism to Europe and Italian Arte Povera to the United States. Sonnabend also sought out and supported some of the most noncommercial and challenging Conceptual, new-media, and performance-based art of the 1970s. The exhibition includes works by approximately 30 artists, including Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, Andy Warhol, Robert Morris, Mario Merz, Vito Acconci, Mel Bochner, John Baldessari, and Jeff Koons. Ileana Sonnabend also brought together a major art collection of her own. She owned Robert Rauschenberg’s Combine painting Canyon (1959), which the Sonnabend family donated to The Museum of Modern Art in 2012.



The Museum of Modern Art Website


Please click here for a Culturekiosque art review of 'Ileana Sonnabend: Ambassador for the New'.

Contact: The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York, NY 10019
Tel: (1) 212 708 94 00

Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle: Say It Isn’t So
NEW YORK  •  Jenkins Johnson Gallery  •  20 February - 26 April 2014
 
Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle’s work was shown in The Studio Museum in Harlem’s Fore exhibition, and she was the youngest participant in the Made in LA 2012 biennial at the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles.

In Say It Isn’t So, Kenyatta A. C. Hinkle (born Louisville, Kentucky, 1987) reconstructs narratives of late 19th century and early 20th century West African ethnographic photography taken mainly by French colonialists. The photographs, which were heavily distributed throughout Europe as postcards and carte-de-visites, enforced the construction of the African (and black) female body as exotic and primitive. Through the embellishment of these photos, Hinkle uses the metaphor of disease to represent colonialism and the poetic interpretation of a virus entering the body. Hinkle interrogates the power dynamics between the gaze, the subject, and the viewer. Her drawings upon these photographs serve as a means to protect, not to consume, the women’s flesh.
 
Also on view will be Hinkle's body of work inspired by Maryse Condé's book I, Tituba, Black Witch of Salem (1992). Conde's historical fiction delves into the story of a woman of color who was a pivotal figure during the Salem Witch Trials. Hinkle is fascinated by how Conde’s reflections on Otherness, racism, gender, sexuality, Diaspora, cultural and religious hegemony, and love intermingle with her own experiences inhabiting a black and pregnant body for the first time. Accompanying this installation will be a collaborative score between Hinkle and performer/composer Kevin Robinson.
 
Say It Isn’t So includes brand new video work by Hinkle that will tackle concepts of endurance, vulnerability, racism, and the female body. Featuring imagery like the artists agape mouth for extended periods of time, recreating specific experiences of racism, and addressing the inhabitation and endurance of pregnancy, Hinkle takes her overarching themes and explorations of the black female body and the exotic into the realm of the performative.


Jenkins Johnson Gallery Website


Contact: Jenkins Johnson Gallery
521 W 26th Street
5th floor
New York, NY 10001
Tel: (1) 212 629 07 07

Luis Jiménez (1940-2006): <EM>Honky Tonk</EM> (1981)Lithograph with glitter, 35 x 50”. El Paso Museum of Art, Purchase with funds provided by the Robert U. and Mabel O. Lipscomb Foundation Endowment, 2004.1.1
Luis Jiménez (1940-2006): Honky Tonk (1981)
Lithograph with glitter, 35 x 50”. El Paso Museum of Art, Purchase with funds provided by the Robert U. and Mabel O. Lipscomb Foundation Endowment, 2004.1.1
Luis Jiménez: Native Son
EL PASO, TEXAS  •  El Paso Museum of Art  •  9 February - 25 May 2014
 
Considered a godfather of Chicano art, Luis Jiménez (1940 - 2006) was instrumental in bringing Chicano sensibilities into the mainstream through his vividly colored, larger-than-life fiberglass sculptures reflecting his Mexican-American heritage. He was also an accomplished and prolific draftsman and printmaker. Jiménez’s focus on everyday human subjects fostered his reputation as an artist of the working class, while his novel treatment of themes and use of pop-culture materials sometimes shocked critics and the public.

Selected exclusively from the holdings of the El Paso Museum of Art and organized by the museum’s Senior Curator, Dr. Patrick Shaw Cable, Luis Jiménez: Native Son features works that date from 1973 to 2004 and represent the artist’s three principal media: lithography, colored-pencil drawing, and fiberglass sculpture—this last technique embodied in a beautifully colored model for a monument honoring fallen firefighters.


El Paso Museum of Art Website


Contact:

El Paso Museum of Art
One Arts Festival Plaza
El Paso, Texas 79901


Tel: (1) 915 532 17 07

Gaspar Enriquez (American 1942 -&nbsp;&nbsp; )<EM>Un Veterano Chingon</EM>, 2006Acrylic on paper, 57” x 52” framedCollection of Paul and Suzanna Dipp
Gaspar Enriquez (American 1942 -   )
Un Veterano Chingon, 2006
Acrylic on paper, 57” x 52” framed
Collection of Paul and Suzanna Dipp
Gaspar Enríquez: Metaphors of El Barrio
EL PASO, TEXAS  •  El Paso Museum of Art  •  26 January - 11 May 2014
 
 
Gaspar Enríquez is often identified as “the quintessential Chicano Texas artist,” although it would be correspondingly just as correct to describe him as an American, portrait painter who blends realism with contemporary popular culture.  Nevertheless, one could easily go down a list counting off the significant series of artworks and other accomplishments of Enríquez’s career: the wearable and the book-like metal objects of the La Familia series, the black and white full-figure portraits of the En la Esquina series, the artist portraits and metal heart icons of the Puro Corazon series, the publication of the twelve paintings of the Elegy on the Death of Cesar Chavez series.

In addition to including over fifty paintings, prints and sculptures from 1983 - 2013 Gaspar Enríquez: Metaphors of El Barrio also includes a video interview with the artist and a book of the same title with texts by Constance Cortez, Ruben Cordova, Christian Gerstheimer, Benito Huerta and Lucy Lippard. Enríquez’s art has been included in many exhibitions throughout his career such as: CARA/ Chicano Art/Resistance and Affirmation 1965-1985, Chicano Visions: American Painters on the Verge, Arte Caliente: Works from the Joe Diaz Collection and Infinite Mirror: Images of American Identity.

El Paso Museum of Art Website


Contact: El Paso Museum of Art
One Arts Festival Plaza
El Paso, Texas 79901

Tel: (1) 915 532 17 07

13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World's Fair
QUEENS, NEW YORK  •  Queens Museum  •  27 April - 7 September 2014
 
 

50 years have passed since an up-and-coming Pop provocateur named Andy Warhol sparked a minor scandal at the 1964 New York World’s Fair. As part of a prominent set of public commissions for the Philip Johnson-designed New York State Pavilion’s exterior, Warhol chose to enlarge mug shots from a NYPD booklet featuring the 13 most wanted criminals of 1962. Forming a chessboard of front and profile views, 13 Most Wanted Men was installed by April 15, 1964, and painted over by Fair officials’ direction with silver paint a few days later. When the Fair opened to the public, all that was visible was a large silver square.  Later in the summer of 1964, Warhol produced another set of the Most Wanted Men paintings with the screens he had used to make the mural and nine of these are assembled in New York for the first time since their creation, forming the core of the 175 or so objects in the exhibition.

13 Most Wanted Men: Andy Warhol and the 1964 World's Fair

The exhibition takes Warhol’s 13 Most Wanted Men as its single subject, addressing its creation and destruction and placing it in its artistic and social context by combining art, documentation, and archival material. Parallel to the striking, somber Men canvases, materials in the exhibition are organized in strict chronological order so the viewer can appreciate the interrelations of underground and establishment; art, protest, and gay life; painting, sculpture, and film in a key year for Warhol; fine art and mainstream culture; and the lives and careers of the major players. A sampling of paintings and sculpture from that year; artists’ and photojournalists’ documentation of the Fair and of the Factory; and never-before-displayed materials from the Andy Warhol Museum archives unwind the mystery behind who ordered the painting-over of the Men and people and places that shaped the work and the incident.



Queens Museum Website


Contact:

Queens Museum
New York City Building
Flushing Meadows Corona Park
Queens, NY 11368

 


Tel: (1) 718.592.97 00

Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Italian, 1598–1680: <EM>Seated Male Nude</EM>, ca. 1618–24Red chalk, heightened with white, on buff laid paperMuseum purchase, Laura P. Hall Memorial Fund and Fowler McCormick, Class of 1921, Fund (2005-128)Photo: Bruce M. White
Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Italian, 1598–1680: Seated Male Nude, ca. 1618–24
Red chalk, heightened with white, on buff laid paper
Museum purchase, Laura P. Hall Memorial Fund and Fowler McCormick, Class of 1921, Fund (2005-128)
Photo: Bruce M. White
500 Years of Italian Master Drawings from the Princeton University Art Museum
PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY  •  Princeton University Art Museum  •  25 January - 11 May 2014
 
 

More than 90 rarely seen masterworks by legendary artists from the 15th through the early 20th centuries, including Carpaccio, Michelangelo, Tiepolo and Modigliani, illustrate significant new research and insights on the Princeton University Art Museum's collection of more than 1,000 Italian drawings, which is widely considered to be one of the finest collections of its kind in the U.S. The exhibition is accompanied by an scholarly catalogue, Italian Master Drawings from the Princeton University Art Museum.

Curated by Laura Giles, the exhibition presents Italian draftsmanship from the early Renaissance to early Modernism. Artists in the exhibition include Barocci, Bernini, Cambiaso, Carpaccio, Annibale Carracci, Cortona, Guercino, Michelangelo, Modigliani, Parmigianino, Rosa, Giambattista and Domenico Tiepolo, Tintoretto and Veronese.

Among the highlights of the exhibition are two standing Middle Eastern women by Venetian artist Vittore Carpaccio (circa 1501–08); an elegant torso of a man in armor by the mannerist master Parmigianino (circa 1521–22); the rare brush drawing Saint Herculianus Visited by an Angel by celebrated Venetian painter Veronese (circa 1586–87); a rare red chalk study of a nude by the groundbreaking Baroque prodigy Gian Lorenzo Bernini (circa 1618–24); Giambattista Tiepolo’s dynamic Seated Woman and Satyr on Clouds (circa 1740); and a languorous female nude by early modernist Amedeo Modigliani (circa 1914).



Princeton University Art Museum Website


Contact: Princeton University Art Museum
Princeton, NJ 08544
Tel: (1) 609 258 37 88

<P>The Prince and the Queen, 1854Salted paper print, hand colouredRoger Fenton—Royal Collection Trust&nbsp; © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2013</P>

The Prince and the Queen, 1854
Salted paper print, hand coloured
Roger Fenton—Royal Collection Trust 
© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2013

A Royal Passion: Queen Victoria and Photography
LOS ANGELES  •  J. Paul Getty Museum  •  4 February - 8 June 2014
 
 

Queen Victoria was about to turn twenty when the invention of the new medium of photography was announced—first in Paris by Louis-Jacques-Mande Daguerre, then in London by William Henry Fox Talbot—at the beginning of 1839. While the two processes were in fact different, they fundamentally changed how we see the world by recording it with a veracity that was unprecedented.

This exhibition explores the relationship between the new art form and the queen, whose passion for collecting photographs began in the 1840s. On display are rare daguerreotypes, private portraits of the Royal Family, and a selection of prints by early masters of photography.



J. Paul Getty Museum Website


Contact: J. Paul Getty Museum
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90049-1687
Tel: (1) 310 440 73 00

Charles Ray: <EM>Plank Piece</EM>, 1973Gelatin silver print, printed 1992
Charles Ray: Plank Piece, 1973
Gelatin silver print, printed 1992
A World of Its Own: Photographic Practices in the Studio
NEW YORK  •  The Museum of Modern Art  •  8 February - 5 October 2014
 
 
Bringing together photographs, films, videos, and works in other mediums, A World of Its Own: Photographic Practices in the Studio examines the ways in which photographers and artists using photography have worked and experimented within the four walls of the studio space, from photography’s inception to today. Featuring both new acquisitions and works from the Museum’s collection that have not been on view in recent years, A World of Its Own includes approximately 180 works, by approximately 90 artists, such as Berenice Abbott, Uta Barth, Zeke Berman, Karl Blossfeldt, Constantin Brancusi, Geta Brătescu, Harry Callahan, Robert Frank, Jan Groover, Barbara Kasten, Man Ray, Bruce Nauman, Paul Outerbridge, Irving Penn, Adrian Piper, Edward Steichen, William Wegman, and Edward Weston.

The show is curated by Quentin Bajac.

The Museum of Modern Art Website


Contact: The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York, NY 10019
Tel: (1) 212 708 94 00

Alfred Leslie: <EM>Don Perlimplin</EM>, 2014 42x42” Digital C print Edition 3 © Alfred Leslie
Alfred Leslie: Don Perlimplin, 2014
42x42” Digital C print
Edition 3
© Alfred Leslie
Alfred Leslie: Pixel Scores
NEW YORK  •  Jane Borden Gallery  •  15 March - 19 April 2014
 
 

Born in Bronx, New York in 1927, multidisciplinary artist Alfred Leslie gained notice in the postwar period on the strength of his early abstract paintings, later figurative works, and independent films. Leslie shifted to a large-scale figurative style by the end of 1962. His new work, a series of monumental, hyper-realist portraits in grisaille, marked Leslie’s reaction to the broadening mainstream acceptance of Abstract Expressionism.

In 1966, just before a planned retrospective at the Whitney Museum, a studio fire upended Leslie’s life and artistic practice by destroying everything from canvases to film footage for works in progress. In the aftermath, Leslie decided to focus on exclusively on painting. He did not complete another film until The Cedar Bar (2002), an exploration of the heated discussions between artists and critic Clement Greenberg that took place in the heyday of Abstract Expressionism. Also in 1996, poet Frank O’Hara, Leslie’s close friend and collaborator, died in a car accident. The loss inspired The Killing Cycle, a series of five major paintings in the manner of Caravaggio and hundreds of studies created between 1967 and 1981.

Leslie has since updated his craft for the digital age. His realistic painting style has been merged with modern technology to create fantastic hybrid views, which the artist calls pixel scores.

Fictional characters, complex and open to interpretation, populate these images. Authors as diverse as Théophile Gautier, Thomas Mann, Chester Himes, and James Fenimore Cooper wrote the characters which Leslie has animated in the pictures on view at the Jane Borden in New York.



Janet Borden, Inc. Website


Contact: Janet Borden, Inc.
560 Broadway, Suite 601
New York NY 10012
Tel: (1) 212 43 10 166

Raymond Pettibon<EM>Untitled (The Weight of the Elements...),</EM> 1994Watercolor and ink on paper13 7/8 x 10 13/16 inches34.9 x 27.3 cmCourtesy of Venus Over Manhattan, New York
Raymond Pettibon
Untitled (The Weight of the Elements...), 1994
Watercolor and ink on paper
13 7/8 x 10 13/16 inches
34.9 x 27.3 cm
Courtesy of Venus Over Manhattan, New York
Are Your Motives Pure? Raymond Pettibon Surfers 1987-2012
NEW YORK  •  Venus Over Manhattan  •  3 April - 17 May 2014
 
 

Los Angeles-based artist Raymond  Pettibon (Born 1957, Tuscon, Arizona) has created a vocabulary of symbols that reappear consistently if enigmatically across his oeuvre. These range from baseball players, vixens, light bulbs, and railway trains, to the cartoon character Gumby and infamous murderer Charles Manson: pet themes repeated and reworked in a classically American combination of abundance and monotony. But the most poetic and revealing of Pettibon’s symbols may be the surfer, the solitary longboarder challenging a massive wave.

Are Your Motives Pure? Raymond Pettibon Surfers 1987-2012, brings together forty works spanning a quarter century of the artist’s career, on loan from important collections. Among works on view are early small-scale, monochrome India ink paintings; numerous paintings from the 1990s when the artist introduced color to his work; and a group of rare, large-scale paintings measuring up to nearly 10 feet wide. Though he lives and works in the storied beach town of Venice, California, Pettibon is not a surfer. Nor can the paintings on view at Venus Over Manhattan be considered "surfer art;" they do not attempt to represent a real surfing scene.



Venus Over Manhattan Website


Contact: Venus Over Manhattan
980 Madison Avenue
New York City
Tel: (1) 212 980 07 00

Barbara Chase-Riboud: <EM>Malcolm X #3</EM>, 1969Polished bronze, rayon, and cotton299.7 × 120 × 25.1 cmBase: 70.5 × 40 cm
Barbara Chase-Riboud: Malcolm X #3, 1969
Polished bronze, rayon, and cotton
299.7 × 120 × 25.1 cm
Base: 70.5 × 40 cm
Barbara Chase-Riboud: The Malcolm X Steles
BERKELEY, CALIRFORNIA  •  BAM/PFA Galleries  •  12 February - 27 April 2014
 
 
Barbara Chase-Riboud: The Malcolm X Steles features six major sculptures, including Confessions for Myself (1972) from the BAM/PFA collection; Peter Selz commissioned the work in conjunction with a 1973 solo exhibition that introduced Chase-Riboud’s work on the West Coast. The current exhibition also includes lyrical drawings from the 1960s that trace the development of the sculptures, as well as the Monument Drawings from 1996 and 1997. These recent drawings, which incorporate text and calligraphic gesture, invoke historical, cultural, and geographical associations, from Queen Sheba’s Monument at Addis Ababa to Man Ray’s The Enigma of Isidore Ducasse.


The University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive Website.


Contact: BAM/PFA Galleries
2626 Bancroft Way
Berkeley, Calirfornia

Tel: (1) 510 642 08 08

Control: Technology in Culture: Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon: It Only Happens All of the Time
SAN FRANCISCO  •  Yerba Buena Center for the Arts  •  7 March - 15 June 2014
 
 

Los Angeles-based artist Jacqueline Kiyomi Gordon works in sound, installation, and sculpture. Her work is often devised around audio and spatial feedback systems that manipulate the visitor's awareness of sound and space, incorporating the physical and sonic qualities of surrounding architecture to engage the viewer's senses. Gordon investigates sonic and architectural applications of cybernetic systems in the 20th and 21st centuries to technological design, from anechoic chambers to the military's use of Long Range Acoustic Device (LRAD) speakers. Reverse-engineering those implements of social control, the dissonant spaces she creates uncover how such systems regulate human subjectivity, mobility, and perception.

Commissioned by YBCA, Gordon's new installation—part of her solo exhibition It Only Happens All of the Time—is an immersive sonic experience that emphasizes the primacy of the embodied experience; one that encourages the visitor to navigate the space through a mode of listening that is both felt and heard.

The term "control" refers to philosopher Gilles Deleuze's theory that, as a result of the ever-increasing role of information technology, Michel Foucault's "disciplinary society" of the 20th century has given way to a "control society" in the 21st century. In contrast to discipline, which molds the individual through confinement in factories, prisons, and schools, control is diffuse, adaptable, and ubiquitous, modulating rather than molding the individual.

 



Yerba Buena Center for the Arts Website


Please click here for a Culturekiosque editorial: Foucault as Opera?

Contact:

Yerba Buena Center for the Arts
Upstairs galleries
701 Mission Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

 


Tel: (1) 415 978 27 00

Cuban America: An Empire State of Mind
BRONX, NEW YORK  •  Lehman College Art Gallery  •  4 February - 14 May 2014
 
 

Cuban America: An Empire State of Mind includes over 35 contemporary artists of Cuban descent, who have been raised in the United States or in Cuba. In this exhibition, a myriad of themes are inspired by America: as the familiar homeland for second and third generation children of Cuban parents, or as the distant, imagined place that has historically empowered diverse ideologies on the Island. In a wide range of perspectives and styles, the United States can be both the backdrop, and the protagonist in diverse narratives. These views, rarely put together, portray multiple landscapes of the concept of empire, so easily associated with both countries, while the works in this exhibition add to the construction of a fresh, as well as complex, image of America: a Cuban America.

Social, cultural, and political discussions are brought to the table while old stereotypes associated with America or Cuba are revisited. In contrast, other artists explore everyday life, make abstractions, or focus on the materials themselves, influenced by nature or the environment. Some artists in the show use contemporary or historical images of American icons and symbols; others draw on remembrances of a distant Cuba that somehow defines them. Cities and their architecture find their way into the work along with imaginary locations.

Cuban America: An Empire State of Mind is co-curated by Yuneikys Villalonga and Susan Hoeltzel and includes a related Cuban video art program organized by guest curator Meykén Barreto. A series of special programs is conducted by guest curator Elvis Fuentes.

Artists in the show include Alejandro Aguilera, Jairo Alfonso, Alexandre Arrechea, Tania Bruguera, María Magdalena Campos, Yoán Capote, Los Carpinteros, Luis Cruz Azaceta, Christian Curiel, Alessandra Expósito, Teresita Fernández, Carlos Garaicoa, Anthony Goicolea, María Elena González, Armando Guiller, Luis Mallo, María Martínez Cañas, Abelardo Morell, Gean Moreno & Ernesto Oroza, Glexis Novoa, Geandy Pavón, Emilio Pérez, Javier Piñón, Carlos Rodríguez Cárdenas, Andrés Serrano, & Katarina Wong.

Video program: Juan Carlos Alom, Allora and Calzadilla, Humberto Díaz, Felipe Dulzaides, Luis Gárciga, Tony Labat, Glenda León, and Ana Olema.



Lehman College Art Gallery Website


Contact: Lehman College Art Gallery
250 Bedford Park Blvd West
Bronx, NY 10468
Tel: (1) 718 960 87 31

Tokuda Yasokichi III: <EM>Y&#333;sai tsubo "k&#333;ga" (Brilliant Glazed Jar "Galaxy"),</EM> ca. 2003, porcelainThe Betsy and Robert Feinberg Collection© The Walters Art MuseumPhoto: John Dean
Tokuda Yasokichi III: Yōsai tsubo "kōga" (Brilliant Glazed Jar "Galaxy"), ca. 2003, porcelain
The Betsy and Robert Feinberg Collection
© The Walters Art Museum
Photo: John Dean
Designed for Flowers: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics
BALTIMORE, MARYLAND  •  The Walters Art Museum  •  23 February - 11 May 2014
 
 

Japan's contemporary ceramic artists draw on traditions begun thousands of years as they create containers for the presentation of flowers.

Comprised almost exclusively of vases drawn from the Betsy and Robert Feinberg Collection, this exhibition displays a wide range of contemporary Japanese ceramic vessels produced for the traditional art of ikebana flower arranging.



The Walters Art Museum Website


Contact:

The Walters Art Museum
600 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD 21201


Tel: (1) 410 547 90 00

Chris Beas:<EM> And the Number One Was Georgie Best...,</EM> 201346 x 48 in. Acrylic on canvas on panel. Courtesy of the artist and Martha Otero Gallery©Chris Beas.
Chris Beas: And the Number One Was Georgie Best..., 2013
46 x 48 in.
Acrylic on canvas on panel.
Courtesy of the artist and Martha Otero Gallery
©Chris Beas.
Fútbol: The Beautiful Game
LOS ANGELES  •  Los Angeles County Museum of Art  •  2 February - 20 July 2014
 
 
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art presents Fútbol: The Beautiful Game, an exhibition examining the sport of fútbol, or soccer, as it is known in the United States. Featuring approximately 50 works by nearly 30 artists on the subject of fútbol—often referred to as “the beautiful game”—the exhibition looks at issues of nationalism, identity, globalism, and mass spectacle as well as the shared human experience between spectators from a multitude of cultures. In anticipation of the 2014 World Cup that takes place in Brazil this summer, LACMA’s exhibition considers the sport through video, photography, painting, sculpture, and large-scale installation.

Two room-sized video installations anchor Fútbol: The Beautiful Game. The first, Zidane: A 21st Century Portrait by the artists Philippe Parreno and Douglas Gordon, provides an intimate portrait of Zinedine Zidane—one of the greatest soccer players in the history of the sport—during the course of a single match. Meanwhile, Stephen Dean’s Volta, set to samba music, directs its gaze at stadium crowds and draws attention to both the pandemonium and organized ritual of mass audiences.

Other works by artists including Robin Rhode, Kehinde Wiley, Petra Cortright, Andy Warhol, Mark Bradford, Mary Ellen Carroll, Hassan Hajjaj, and Andreas Gursky, among others, provide a sense of the possibilities of the sport as a universal conversation piece.


Los Angeles County Museum of Art Website


Contact: Los Angeles County Museum of Art
5905 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90036
Tel: (1) 323 857 60 00

Golden Visions of Densatil: A Tibetan Buddhist Monastery
NEW YORK  •  Asia Society  •  19 February - 18 May 2014
 
 

Asia Society presents the first exhibition to explore the history, iconography, and extraordinary artistic production associated with the central Tibetan Buddhist monastery called Densatil that was destroyed during China’s Cultural Revolution.

The exhibition reunites a selection of reliefs and sculptures salvaged from the Monastery’s towering thirteenth- to fifteenth-century inlaid gilt copper memorial stupas (tashi gomang). Works on view are from public and private collections in the United States and Europe.

Golden Visions of Densatil: A Tibetan Buddhist Monastery illuminates the artistry of the tashi gomang stupas—special memorial stupas masterfully designed and cast in relief by artists, including craftsmen from Nepal—and the spiritual journey toward enlightenment laid out in their imagery.



Asia Society Website


Contact: Asia Society
725 Park Avenue at 70th Street
New York, NY 10021

Tel: (1) 212 288 64 00

Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take
MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA  •  Walker Art Center  •  15 February - 11 May 2014
 
 
Featuring some 75 pieces produced from 1987 through the present, Jim Hodges: Give More Than You Take brings together photography, drawing, works on paper, and objects rendered in mirror, lightbulbs, silk flowers, and glass alongside several major room-size installations. This is the first comprehensive survey to be organized in the United States on the work of the New York–based artist.

Walker Art Center Website


Contact: Walker Art Center
1750 Hennepin Avenue
Minneapolis, Minnesota 55403

Tel: 1) 612 375 76 00

John Divola: As Far As I Could Get
LOS ANGELES  •  Los Angeles County Museum of Art  •  6 October 2013 - 6 July 2014
 
 

American artist John Divola melds the disciplines of sculpture, painting, and performance art –and using photography to document the resulting experience- Divola’s work is at once a deadpan depiction of the geography around him as it is a document of the aesthetic possibilities subliminally present around us.

John Divola: Dogs Chasing My Car in the Desert,
John Divola: Dogs Chasing My Car in the Desert, D24 Run Sequence
Courtesy Santa Barbara Museum of Art

LACMA’s presentation includes Polaroid images of sculpted objects, serial works comprised of appropriated continuity shots and stereographs, and conceptual landscapes in which the artist himself appears in a performative role.

 



Los Angeles County Museum of Art Website


Contact: Los Angeles County Museum of Art
5905 Wilshire Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90036

Tel: (1) 323 857 60 00

Korakrit Arunanondchai
LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW YORK  •  MoMA PS1  •  9 March - 25 May 2014
 
 

Bangkok-raised artist Korakrit Arunanondchai (Thai, b. 1986) engages with subjects such as history, authorship, self-representation, and tourism through the lens of a cultural transplant. His work seeks to find a common ground in artistic experiences through a mix of styles and mediums.

At MoMA PS1 Arunanondchai presents 2012-2555 (2012), a large-scale installation which is the first in a trilogy of video-installations. Named for the year in which it was produced (2555 is the year 2012 on the Buddhist Calendar), the work features footage of the artist revisiting his artistic achievements from 2008 to 2011 and documents his grandparents as they transform the family garden into their "elderly home." For Arunanondchai, the installation evokes the cyclical nature of life and memory.

Korakrit Arunanondchai. 2012-2555. 2012
Korakrit Arunanondchai: 2012-2555, 2012 Performance, two-channel video loop, flat screens, metal, wood, plastic, digital print on canvas, digital print on vinyl, fluorescent lights, plastic flowers.
Photo courtesy the artist and CLEARING, New York

Shown along with 2012–2555 are three series of paintings generated from different videos. Untitled (Muen Kuey), was born from 2556, the second video in the trilogy. The paint marks on the denim result from a re-performance of Duangjai Jansaunoi’s use of her own body to paint on canvas during season 2 of Thailand’s Got Talent. Jansaunoi, whose performance outraged viewers and sparked a dialogue on the role of performance art in Thai culture, was a part-time female go-go dancer, who was paid to go on the famed Thai show in order to increase the number of viewers. Named after a popular Thai song, Muen Kuey, which translates to “It’s always the same,” the paintings are each accompanied by 100 DVDs containing documentation of Arunanondchai’s performance, Jansaunoi’s performance and the televised critique of her performance by famed Thai artist Chalermchai Kositpipat.



MoMA P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center Website


Contact: P.S.1 Contemporary Art Center
22-25 Jackson Ave at the intersection of 46th Ave
Long Island City, NY 11101
Tel: (1) 718 784 20 84

Mark di Suvero at Crissy Field
SAN FRANCISCO  •  Crissy Field  •  22 May 2013 - 26 May 2014
 
 

Eight large-scale sculptures by Mark di Suvero rise at historic Crissy Field this May for a free yearlong exhibition presented by SFMOMA in partnership with the National Park Service and Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy.  Brought together  from across the Unitied States, the steel structures are set against the backdrop of the Golden Gate Bridge, a structure that has inspired the artist throughout his career.

Coinciding with di Suvero's 80th birthday, the exhibition not only marks five decades of work, it also holds particular significance for the artist who emigrated from Shanghai to San Francisco at the age of seven. His passage beneath the Golden Gate Bridge—which opened a few years before his arrival—proved to be a lasting inspiration, as the scale and color of the structure have inspired di Suvero throughout his life. di Suvero notes, "It was like a rainbow, a bridge coming to the New World starting a new life. The woman who chose the color of the bridge, Malo Lowell, taught me how to work wood as a teenager and from there, all was freedom."



San Francisco Museum of Modern Art Website


Contact: Crissy Field
San Francisco, California 
Tel: (1) 415 357 41 71

Nalini Malani: Transgressions
NEW YORK  •  Asia Society  •  19 February - 3 August 2014
 
 

Nalini Malani was born in 1946 in Karachi before the 1947 Partition of India and was trained as a painter at the Sir Jamsetjee Jeejebhoy School of Art in Mumbai (1964–1969). Malani became known as a pioneer in India in the 1980s for her attention to feminist issues, and later in the early 1990s for her innovative theater and installation projects. Her multimedia projects feature recurring themes around the subjects of gender, memory, race, and transnational politics, especially in reference to India’s postcolonial history after independence and partition. The artist often draws upon stories from Hindu and Greek mythology, nineteenth-century literary nonsense writing by such authors as Lewis Carroll and Edward Lear, and early-twentieth-century experimental theater to create allegories for present day events.

Transgressions II, 2009, a video/shadow play from the Asia Society Museum Collection, explores the nuances of western postcolonial dominance in India. This three-channel video installation integrates the folk sensibility of traditional shadow plays with new technology.



Asia Society Website


Contact: Asia Society
725 Park Avenue at 70th Street
New York, NY 10021
Tel: (1) 212 288 64 00

Pablo Helguera: Librería Donceles
PHOENIX, ARIZONA  •  Combine Studios  •  21 March - 21 June 2014
 
 
Pablo Helguera: Librería Donceles

Helguera’s installation takes the form of an itinerant Spanish-language bookstore comprised of over 12,000 used books on virtually every subject. The installation recreates the unique intellectually and culturally rich environment of a secondhand bookstore and questions how Spanish is integrated into the broader cultural life of Arizona.


Arizona State University Art Museum Website


Contact:

Combine Studios
821 N. 3rd Street
Phoenix, AZ 85004

 


Tel: (1) 480 965 27 87

Athi-Patra Ruga in <EM>The Future White Women of Azania</EM>, 2012. Photo: Ruth Simboa
Athi-Patra Ruga in The Future White Women of Azania, 2012. Photo: Ruth Simboa
Public Intimacy: Art and Other Ordinary Acts in South Africa
SAN FRANCISCO  •  Yerba Buena Center for the Arts  •  21 February - 29 June 2014
 
 

Jointly organized by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA), Public Intimacy: Art and Other Ordinary Acts in South Africa brings together 25 artists and collectives who disrupt expected images of a country known through its apartheid history. The exhibition features an arc of artists who look to the intimate encounters of daily life to express the poetics and politics of the “ordinary act,” with work primarily from the last five years as well as photographic works that figure as historical precedents.

Exhibition Artists

Public Intimacy presents

Photography by Ian Berry, Ernest Cole, David Goldblatt, Terry Kurgan, Sabelo Mlangeni, Santu Mofokeng, Billy Monk, Zanele Muholi, Lindeka Qampi, Jo Ractliffe, and Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse

Video works by William Kentridge, Donna Kukama, Anthea Moys, and Berni Searle

Painting and sculpture by Nicholas Hlobo and Penny Siopis

Puppetry by Handspring Puppet Company

Publications, prints, graphic works, and public interventions by Chimurenga, ijusi (Garth Walker), Anton Kannemeyer, and Cameron Platter

Performances by Athi-Patra Ruga, Kemang Wa Lehulere, and Sello Pesa and Vaughn Sadie with Ntsoana Contemporary Dance Theatre



Yerba Buena Center for the Arts Website


Contact: Yerba Buena Center for the Arts
701 Mission Street
San Francisco, CA

Tel: (1) 415 321 13 07

<P><SPAN class=pie _extended="true">Kuroda Seiki (1866–1924): <SPAN class=pie _extended="true"><EM>Maiko Girl</EM>, 1893.</SPAN>Oil on canvas; 80.4 x 65.3cm</SPAN><SPAN class=pie _extended="true">Tokyo National Museum, A-11258</SPAN></P>

Kuroda Seiki (1866–1924): Maiko Girl, 1893.
Oil on canvas; 80.4 x 65.3cm
Tokyo National Museum, A-11258

Remaking Tradition: Modern Art of Japan from the Tokyo National Museum
CLEVELAND, OHIO  •  The Cleveland Museum of Art  •  16 February - 11 May 2014
 
 
Remaking Tradition: Modern Art of Japan from the Tokyo National Museum features fifty-five masterpieces of modern Japanese art from the late nineteenth to the twentieth centuries, including six Important Cultural Properties of Japan designated by the Japanese government. Drawn exclusively from the holdings of the Tokyo National Museum in a range of media including painting, sculpture, tapestry, ceramics and calligraphy, this exhibition marks the first time that a collection of modern Japanese art of this size and quality has ever been displayed outside of Japan.

Cleveland Museum of Art Website


Contact: Cleveland Museum of Art
11150 East Boulevard
Cleveland, Ohio 44106
Tel: (1) 216 421 73 40

<EM>Samba Spirit: Modern Afro Brazilian Art</EM>
Samba Spirit: Modern Afro Brazilian Art
Samba Spirit: Modern Afro Brazilian Art
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS  •  Museum of Fine Arts, Boston  •  18 January - 19 October 2014
 
 

The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), presents a selection of works by 20th-century Brazilian artists of mostly African descent in Samba Spirit: Modern Afro Brazilian Art. Opening the weekend of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the exhibition includes 15 paintings and one work on paper by key artists including Heitor dos Prazeres, Maria Auxiliadoro da Silva and Waldemiro de Deus, as well as two sculptures by Agnaldo Manoel Dos Santos. Rarely studied in the United States, these artists drew on a range of traditions and found inspiration in all aspects of Brazilian culture—religious rituals, urban and rural life, music and dance.

In the 19th century, Brazil had the largest population of African slaves in the Americas and was the last to abolish the institution in 1888.  The pervasive impact of slavery on subsequent generations led one sociologist to write, “Every Brazilian, even the light-skinned fair-haired one, carries with him on his soul, when not on soul and body alike…the influence of the African, either direct or vague or remote.”  The resulting blend of African, European and indigenous cultures can be seen throughout Brazil, from the world-famous choreography of the samba and the frevo to the practices associated with the Candomblé and Umbanda faiths.  This influence extends to the visual arts as well, where the depiction of subjects and symbols related to the experiences of Afro Brazilians is prevalent.



Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Website


Contact:

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA 02115

 


Tel: (1) 617 267 93 00

Sarah Lucas: NUD NOB
NEW YORK  •  Gladstone Gallery  •  7 March - 26 April 2014
 
 

British artist Sarah Lucas's first US exhibition in nearly a decade features a series of large-scale bronze and cast-concrete sculptures displayed variously on pedestals, and, at other times, installed directly on the floor. Characteristic of Lucas’s practice, the works simultaneously suggest multiple forms, as with the two monumental bronze works Florian and Kevin, which appear as both oversized vegetables and phallic-shaped sculptures.

Sarah Lucas: Nud Nob Installation New York
Sarah Lucas: NUD NOB
Installation view: Gladstone Gallery

Human anatomy has long fascinated Sarah Lucas (born 1962, London), and even in her earliest works she substituted furniture for human body parts, often adding a suggestion of genitalia. In her recent work, the form of the phallus in particular has been a recurring visual motif, one that she sees as “a perfectly self-contained sculptural form, ‘pregnant’ with meaning.” The exhibition further investigates her interest in the phallus with two cast-concrete works, Eros and Priapus, which are displayed in recumbent positions, resting on pedestals crafted out of crushed cars.  Referencing the Greek gods of love and fertility, respectfully, Lucas uses the titling of her work to infuse the sculptures with a humorous gesture. Language and its potential for both poetic alliteration and sly allusion is central to Lucas's works, and her titles often draw on slang, puns, and historical references to invoke allusions that are variously erotic, romantic, and funny.



Gladstone Gallery Website


Contact:

Gladstone Gallery
515 West 24th Street
New York, NY


 


Tel: (1) 212 206 93 00

Sound Vision: Contemporary Art from the Collection
DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA  •  Nasher Museum of Art  •  6 March - 8 August 2014
 
 

Sound Vision: Contemporary Art from the Collection  includes paintings, works on paper, photography, video, installation and sculpture. The show features 37 works by artists including Njideka Akunyili, Radcliffe Bailey, Sanford Biggers, William Cordova, Noah Davis, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Charles Gaines, Deborah Grant, Barkley L. Hendricks, Taiyo Kimura, Christian Marclay, Kerry James Marshall, Vitaly Komar and Alex Melamid, Zanele Muholi, Odili Donald Odita, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Robert Pruitt, Dario Robleto, Gary Simmons, Xaviera Simmons, Burk Uzzle, Nari Ward, Andy Warhol, Carrie Mae Weems and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye.



Contact:

Nasher Museum of Art
at Duke University
2001 Campus Drive
Durham, NC 27705

 


Tel: (1) 919 684 51 35

Thanks for Writing
NEW YORK  •  601Artspace  •  27 February - 14 June 2014
 
 

In organizing TFW [Thanks for Writing], I wanted to collapse the distance between the experiences of reading texts about or related to art and viewing artworks. The show’s installation literalizes and plays with the cliché of reading as a metaphor for viewing and interpretation by offering images that must be read and texts to view — not to mention, read.

Mariam Rahmani

Artists whose works are on view:

John Baldessari , Taysir Batniji, Jennifer Dalton, Oskar Dawicki, Oasa DuVerney, Shahab Fotouhi, Sara Al Haddad, Ann Hamilton, Liz Larner, Christian Marclay, Rivane Neuenschwander, William Powhida, Jessica Rankin, UBIK



601Artspace Website


Contact: 601Artspace
601 W 26th St., Ste. 1755
New York, NY 10001

Tel: (1) 212 243 27 35

<SPAN class=pie _extended="true">Camille Pissaro (French, 1830-1903):<EM> Place du Carrousel, Paris 1900</EM>Oil on canvas, 21 5/8 x 25 3/4 inchesNational Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection, 1970.17.55.</SPAN>
Camille Pissaro (French, 1830-1903): Place du Carrousel, Paris 1900
Oil on canvas, 21 5/8 x 25 3/4 inches
National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
Ailsa Mellon Bruce Collection, 1970.17.55.
The Art of the Louvre’s Tuileries Garden
TOLEDO, OHIO  •  Toledo Museum of Art  •  13 February - 11 May 2014
 
 

The Art of the Louvre’s Tuileries Garden presents 100 paintings, photographs, drawings and sculptures by some of the most acclaimed European and American artists from the 17th to the 20th centuries.

The Tuileries in Paris has a long and storied history. Originally commissioned in 1564 by dowager queen Catherine de Medici, it combined a magnificent palace and an extensive formal garden. In the mid-17th century Louis XIV (the “Sun King”) ordered its expansion and extraordinary embellishment. André Le Nôtre (1613 – 1700), designer of the renowned gardens of Versailles and Vaux-le-Vicomte, ingeniously designed and realized the grand project.

Residents of the famous Tuileries Palace included several French kings—Louis XIV, Louis XV, and Louis XVI—as well as Marie Antoinette and Napoleon Bonaparte. While the palace was internationally noted for its elegance and royal associations, an uprising of 1871 saw it gutted by fire. The palace lay empty and desolate until 1883, when the government of the Third Republic ordered its demolition. Today, a lawn connecting the westernmost pavilions of the Louvre marks its original site. Prints, vintage photographs and a scale model will trace the history, grand style and ghostly presence of the historic structure.

In part, the exhibition celebrates the career of Le Nôtre—generally regarded as the greatest landscape architect in European history—on the 400th anniversary of his birth. His design for the Tuileries Garden richly combined magnificent vistas, lawns, fountains, hedges, pathways, flowerbeds, terraces and wooded areas, all of the ensemble embellished with sculpture.

Today, more than 10 million visitors stroll through the famous Parisian park annually.



Toledo Museum of Art Website


Contact: Toledo Museum of Art
2445 Monroe Street
Toledo, OH
Tel: (1) 419 255 80 00

Bob Adelman: <EM>An Urgent Message</EM>, Washington, DC, 1963 Courtesy of the Photographer
Bob Adelman: An Urgent Message, Washington, DC, 1963 Courtesy of the Photographer
The Movement: Bob Adelman and Civil Rights Era Photography
FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA  •  NSU Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale  •  19 January - 17 May 2014
 
 

In commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, NSU Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale unveils an exhibition featuring some 100 images of American photographer Bob Adelman (born 1931).

Between 1963 and 1968, Adelman was a photographer for the Congress of Racial Equality, the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, and other civil rights organizations. His work granted him unique access to the movement’s most important events and figures, and he forged close ties with such civil rights leaders as Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, John Lewis, and James Baldwin. His work was featured in major publications of the civil rights period.

Events documented in the exhibition include: the Freedom Rides; the 1963 Birmingham demonstrations during which demonstrators were hosed and attacked by police dogs; the 1963 March on Washington, which culminated in Martin Luther King's "I have a Dream" speech; voter registration drives; the 1965 Selma-to-Montgomery March; and Martin Luther King,Jr funeral. A number of the photographs on view in the exhibition have never before been published.



NSU Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale Website


Contact: NSU Museum of Art Fort Lauderdale
One East Las Olas Boulevard
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Tel: (1) 954 525 55 00

<SPAN class=pie _extended="true"><EM>The Newsboy,</EM> 1888Carved, assembled and painted wood with folded tin42 x 20 x 11 in. (106.68 x 50.8 x 27.94 cm)Milwaukee Art MuseumThe Michael and Julie Hall Collection of American Folk Art Photo: John Nienhuis.</SPAN><BR _extended="true"><BR _extended="true">
The Newsboy, 1888
Carved, assembled and painted wood with folded tin
42 x 20 x 11 in. (106.68 x 50.8 x 27.94 cm)
Milwaukee Art Museum
The Michael and Julie Hall Collection of American Folk Art
Photo: John Nienhuis.


Uncommon Folk: Traditions in American Art
MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN  •  Milwaukee Art Museum  •  31 January - 4 May 2014
 
 
Nearly six hundred objects of folk and self-taught art, from duck decoys and quilts to the work of Grandma Moses are on  on view in Uncommon Folk: Traditions in American Art. The exhibition presents a whimsical installation of American paintings, drawings, sculpture, photography, textiles, furniture, and decorative arts, drawn from its celebrated collection.

Among the artists represented in Uncommon Folk are Grandma Moses, Edgar Tolson, Felipe Archuleta, Howard Finster, Sister Gertrude Morgan, and Morris Hirshfield. In addition, the show highlights several Wisconsin artists including Prophet Blackmon, Josephus Farmer, Michael Lenk, Simon Sparrow, Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, and Albert Zahn.

Milwaukee Art Museum Web Site


Contact:

Milwaukee Art Museum
700 N. Art Museum Drive
Milwaukee, WI 53202


Tel: (1) 414 224 32 20

Marco Breuer: <EM>Spin </EM>(C-813), 2008chromogenic paper, scratched14 9/16 x 11 5/8 inches, unique
Marco Breuer: Spin (C-813), 2008
chromogenic paper, scratched
14 9/16 x 11 5/8 inches, unique
What Is a Photograph?
NEW YORK  •  International Center of Photography  •  31 January - 4 May 2014
 
 

What Is a Photograph? explores the range of creative experimentation that has occurred in photography since the 1970s. The show brings together 21 emerging and established artists who have reconsidered and sought to reinvent the role of light, color, composition, materiality, and the subject in the art of photography. For example, German artist Marco Breuer attempts to answer the question: What is a photograph? Breuer’s experimental approach eschews the camera itself. Instead, he strips photography to its essential materiality, presenting works created by manipulating the surface of light-sensitive photographic paper such as in Spin (C-813), 2008 (at left).

Participating artists:

Matthew Brandt b. 1982, Los Angeles; lives and works in Los Angeles.
Marco Breuer b. 1966, Landshut, Germany; lives and works in New York State.
Liz Deschenes b. 1966, Boston; lives and works in New York City.
Adam Fuss b. 1961, London; lives and works in New York City.
Owen Kydd b. 1975, Calgary, Canada; lives and works in Los Angeles.
Floris Neusüss b. 1937, Lennep, Germany; lives and works in Kassel, Germany.
Marlo Pascual b. 1972, Nashville; lives and works in Brooklyn.
Sigmar Polke 1941–2010; Germany.
Eileen Quinlan b. 1972, Boston; lives and works in New York City.
Jon Rafman b. 1981, Montreal; lives and works in Montreal.
Gerhard Richter b. 1932, Dresden; lives and works in Cologne.
Mariah Robertson b. 1975, Indianapolis; lives and works in Brooklyn.
Alison Rossiter b. 1953, Jackson, Mississippi; lives and works in the metro New York area.
Lucas Samaras b. 1936, Macedonia, Greece; lives and works in New York City.
David Benjamin Sherry b. 1981, Woodstock, New York; lives and works in Los Angeles.
Travess Smalley b. 1986, Huntington, West Virginia; lives and works in New York City.
Kate Steciw b. 1978, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania; lives and works in Brooklyn.
Artie Vierkant b. 1986, Breinerd, Minnesota; lives and works in New York City.
James Welling b. 1951, Hartford, Connecticut; lives and works in Los Angeles.
Christopher Williams b. 1956, Los Angeles; lives and works in Cologne, Düsseldorf, and Amsterdam.
Letha Wilson b. 1976, Honolulu; lives and works in Brooklyn.

The show is accompanied by a full-color catalogue published by DelMonico Books / Prestel with essays by Carol Squiers, Geoffrey Batchen, Hito Steyerl, and George Baker.



International Center of Photography Website


Contact: International Center of Photography
1133 Avenue of the Americas at 43rd Street
New York, NY 10036
Tel: (1) 212 85 70 000

Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties
BROOKLYN, NEW YORK  •  Brooklyn Museum  •  7 March - 6 July 2014
 
 
Witness: Art and Civil Rights in the Sixties offers a focused look at painting, sculpture, graphics, and photography from a decade defined by social protest and American race relations. In observance of the fiftieth anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, this exhibition considers how sixty-six of the decade’s artists, including African Americans and some of their white, Latino, Asian American, Native American, and Caribbean contemporaries, used wide-ranging aesthetic approaches to address the struggle for racial justice.

Bringing activism to bear in gestural and geometric abstraction, assemblage, Minimalism, Pop imagery, and photography, these artists produced powerful works informed by the experience of inequality, conflict, and empowerment. In the process, they tested the political viability of their art, and originated subjects that spoke to resistance, self-definition, and blackness.

Brooklyn Museum Website


Contact: Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway
Brooklyn, NY 11238-605

Tel: (1) 718 638 50 00

Events in Classical Music

Paul Jacobs, organ
LOS ANGELES  •  Walt Disney Concert Hall  •  4 May 2014
 
J.S. Bach: Clavier-Übung III 

Organist Paul Jacobs performs the complete Clavier-Übung III, the “German Organ Mass,” a monumental masterpiece containing some of Bach’s most complex and most demanding organ compositions.

Walt Disney Concert Hall Website



Detailed schedule information:
7:30 pm

Contact:

Walt Disney Concert Hall
111 South Grand Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90012


Tel: (1) 323 850 20 00

Philadelphia Chamber Music Society: Emanuel Ax, piano
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA  •  Kimmel Center  •  7 May 2014
 

Brahms: Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Handel, Op. 24
Mazzoli: Sonata [Philadelphia Premiere]
Brahms: Klavierstücke, Op. 118
Intermission
Dean: Sonata [Philadelphia Premiere]
Brahms: Variations from Sextet in B-flat Major, Op. 18
Brahms: Soanta in F-sharp Minor, Op. 2

Philadelphia Chamber Music Society
Emanuel Ax, piano



Kimmel Center Website



Detailed schedule information:
8:00 pm

Contact: Kimmel Center
300 S. Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102
Tel: (1) 215 790 58 00

Jan Lisiecki© DG / Mathias Bothor
Jan Lisiecki
© DG / Mathias Bothor
Philadelphia Orchestra: Jan Lisiecki, piano
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA  •  Kimmel Center  •  Yannick Nézet-Séguin, conductor
 

Mozart Overture to The Marriage of Figaro
Mozart Piano Concerto No. 21, K. 467
Mozart Symphony No. 41 ("Jupiter")

Philadelphia Orchestra
Yannick Nézet-Séguin, conductor
Jan Lisiecki, piano



Kimmel Center Website



Detailed schedule information:
8:00 pm

Contact: Kimmel Center
300 S. Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102
Tel: (1) 215 790 58 00

Philadelphia Orchestra: Lisa Batiashvili, violin
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA  •  Kimmel Center  •  1 - 3 May 2014
 

Barber: Adagio for Strings
Bartók: Violin Concerto No. 1
Bruckner: Symphony No. 9

Philadelphia Orchestra
Yannick Nézet-Séguin, conductor
Lisa Batiashvili, violin

 



Kimmel Center Website



Detailed schedule information:
8:00 pm

Contact: Kimmel Center
300 S. Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102
Tel: (1) 215 790 58 00

Nicholas Phan
Nicholas Phan
Nicholas Phan, tenor: Myra Huang, piano
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS  •  Pickman Hall  •  17 April 2014
 
Schubert, Benjamin Britten

Nicholas Phan, tenor
Myra Huang, piano


Detailed schedule information:
8:00 pm

Contact: Tel: (1) 617 747 22 61

Midori, violin: Ozgur Aydin, piano
LOS ANGELES  •  Walt Disney Concert Hall  •  23 April 2014
 
 

Debussy: Violin Sonata in G minor
Shostakovich: Violin Sonata, Op. 134
Beethoven: Violin Sonata No. 10 in G, Op. 96
Schubert: Rondo brilliant in B minor, D. 895

Midori, violin
Ozgur Aydin, piano



Walt Disney Concert Hall Website



Detailed schedule information:
8:00 pm

Contact:

Walt Disney Concert Hall
111 South Grand Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90012


Tel: (1) 323 850 20 00

Events in Dance

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS  •  Citi Wang Theatre  •  1 - 4 May 2014
 

Classic works by Alvin Ailey himself, seen on Friday evening and both weekend matinees, include the immortal Revelations and a trio of Mr. Ailey's dances set to the music of Duke Ellington: Night Creature, Pas de Duke, and The River.


The program of newer works, seen on opening night and Saturday evening, features Wayne McGregor's Chroma (2006), the Boston premiere of Aszure Barton's LIFT (2013), and Bill T. Jones' D-Man in the Waters (Part 1) (1989, revised 1998).




Detailed schedule information:
Thursday | 7:30pm (new program)
Friday | 8pm (classics)
Saturday | 2pm (classics)
Saturday | 8pm (new program)
Sunday | 3pm (classics)

Contact: Citi Wang Theatre
Citi Performing Arts Center
270 Tremont Street
Boston, MA 02116

Tel: (1) 617 48 29 39 3

American Ballet Theatre
WASHINGTON, DC  •  Kennedy Center  •  15 - 20 April 2014
 

American Ballet Theatre
Kevin McKenzie, Artistic Director
Kennedy Center Opera House Orchestra
 
Programme:

17 - 20 April 2014
Don Quixote
Choreography by Marius Petipa and Alexander Gorsky
Staged by Kevin McKenzie and Susan Jones
Music by Ludwig Minkus


15 - 16 April 2014

Works by Fokine, Gomes, and Ashton

Les Sylphides (Fokine/Chopin, Britten)
Aftereffect (Gomes/Tchaikovsky)
The Dream (Ashton/Mendelssohn)



The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Website



Detailed schedule information:
7:30 pm

Contact: The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
2700 F Street, NW
Washington, DC 20566
Tel: (1) 202 467 46 00

Ballet Preljocaj: Snow White
NEW YORK  •  The Joyce Theater  •  23 - 27 April 2014
 
Ballet Preljocaj:  Snow White

Contact: The Joyce Theater
175 Eighth Avenue
New York, NY

Tel: (1) 212 242 08 00

Mark Morris Dance Group
Mark Morris Dance Group
Mark Morris Dance Group: Acis and Galatea
BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA  •  Hertz Hall  •  25 - 27 April 2014
 

Mark Morris Dance Group: Acis and Galatea

Mark Morris Dance Group, and Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra present their latest joint undertaking, the world premiere of a production featuring Mozart's brilliant arrangement of a Handel score. An epic love story from Ovid's Metamorphoses set along the pastoral banks of the Mediterranean, Acis and Galatea is performed in English by four vocalists and the Mark Morris Dance Group, joined by the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra and Chorale. Handel finished the opera in 1739 and Mozart later arranged it in the classical style, expanding the instrumental colors of the score and adding his signature clarity of orchestration.

Sets by Adrianne Lobel
Costumes by Isaac Mizrahi
Lighting by Michael Chybowski

Cast :

Thomas Cooley, tenor (Acis)
Sherezade Panthaki, soprano (Galatea)
Douglas Williams, bass-baritone (Polyphemus)
Zach Finkelstein (Damon)

Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra and Chorale
Nicholas McGegan, conductor




Detailed schedule information:
8:00 pm. 3:00 pm

Contact: University of California
Hertz Hall
Berkeley, CA, 94720-4800

Tel: (1) 510 642 99 88

Philadanco©Lois Greenfield
Philadanco
©Lois Greenfield
The Philadelphia Dance Company: Blood, Sweat, and Dance
PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA  •  Kimmel Center  •  17 - 19 April 2014
 

Philadanco: Blood, Sweat, and Dance

The Philadelphia Dance Company

Programme:

Ulysses Dove: Bad Blood
Gene Hill Sagan: Suite En Bleu
Rennie Harris: Philadelphia Experiment
Donald Byrd: Bamm

 



Kimmel Center Website



Detailed schedule information:
7:30 pm

Contact: Kimmel Center
300 S. Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102

Tel: (1) 215 790 58 00

Events in Jazz

The Marcus Shelby Orchestra: The Legacy of Duke Ellington: 50 Years of Swing!
BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA  •  Hertz Hall  •  2 May 2014
 
The Marcus Shelby Orchestra and special guests present The Legacy of Duke Ellington: 50 Years of Swing

CalPerformances Website



Detailed schedule information:
8:00 pm

Contact: University of California
Hertz Hall
Berkeley, CA, 94720-4800

Tel: (1) 510 642 99 88

The Terence Blanchard Group: with special guest Lionel Loueke
WASHINGTON, DC  •  Kennedy Center  •  9 May 2014
 
The Terence Blanchard Group with special guest Lionel Loueke


The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Website



Detailed schedule information:
7:30 pm

Contact: The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
2700 F Street, NW
Washington, DC 20566
Tel: (1) 202 467 46 00

Juilliard Jazz: Our Voices
NEW YORK  •  Juilliard School of Music  •  16 April 2014
 

Juilliard Jazz: Our Voices features original student-composed works performed by Juilliard Jazz Ensembles.

The Matthew Jodrell Ensemble features tenor saxophonist Julian Lee; trumpeter Nathan Sparks; trombonist Kalia Vandever; pianist David Linard; bassist Russell Hall; and drummer Dag Markhus. They perform Aphorism by David Linard, Waltz Vandelay by Dag Markhus, Reminiscing in Nostalgia by Kalia Vandever, Midwest Midwinter by Nathan Sparks, I Blame Memory by Julian Lee, and Neanderthal by Russell Hall.

The Rodney Jones Ensemble features alto saxophonist Taylor Herron; tenor saxophonist Dean Tsur; trumpeter Joe Boga; trumpeter Enrique Sanchez; vibraphonist Joe Doubleday; pianist Jahaan Sweet; bassist Dan Stein; and drummer Andrew Wangemann. They perform Chronos by Taylor Herron, Apollo by Joe Doubleday, Ares by Enrique Sanchez, Arête by Andrew Wangemann, Aphrodite by Jahaan Sweet, Icarus by Joe Boga, Poseidon by Dan Stein, and Dionysus by Dean Tsur.



Juilliard Jazz Website



Detailed schedule information:
8:00 pm

Contact: Paul Hall
Juilliard School of Music
155 West 65th Street
1st Floor
New York, NY
Tel: (1) 212 769 74 06

Kevin Mahogany
WASHINGTON, DC  •  Kennedy Center  •  26 April 2014
 
Vocalist Kevin Mahogany returns to the Kennedy Center with a blues-heavy set celebrating his 20-year career as an artist

The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Website



Detailed schedule information:
7:30 pm

Contact: The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts
2700 F Street, NW
Washington, DC 20566
Tel: (1) 202 467 46 00

Gary Bartz Quartet
NEW YORK  •  Minton's Supper Club  •  30 April 2014
 
 
Gary Bartz Quartet: Barney Mcall (piano), James Hing (bass) and Greg Bandy (drums)

Minton's Supper Club Website



Detailed schedule information:
7:00 pm, 9:30 pm

Contact:

Minton's Supper Club
206 West 118th Street
New York, NY 10026


Tel: (1) 212.243.2222

Ray Angry Quartet featuring Nadia Washington
NEW YORK  •  Minton's Supper Club  •  23 April 2014
 
 
Ray Angry Quartet featuring Nadia Washington: Nina Simone Tribute

Minton's Supper Club Website



Detailed schedule information:
7:00 pm, 9:30 pm

Contact:

Minton's Supper Club
206 West 118th Street
New York, NY 10026

 


Tel: (1) 212.243.2222.

Events in Opera

Il ritorno d'Ulisse in patria: By Claudio Monteverdi
BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS  •  NEC's Jordan Hall  •  25 - 26 April 2014
 
 

Claudio Monteverdi (1567 - 1643): Il ritorno d'Ulisse in patria, SV 325 (The Return of Ulysses to his Homeland), 1639-1640
Prologue and five acts (later revised to three)
Libretto by Giacomo Badoaro

Semi-staged opera performances
Directed by Mark Streshinsky
Boston Baroque
Sung in Italian

Cast
Fernando Guimarães, Ulisse/tenor
Jennifer Rivera, Penelope/mezzo-soprano
Leah Wool, Minerva/mezzo-soprano
Daniel Auchincloss, Eumete/tenor
Abigail Nims, Melanto/mezzo-soprano
Aaron Sheehan, Telemaco/tenor
Daniel Shirley, Eurimaco/tenor
Marc Molomot, Iro/tenor
Sara Heaton, Amore/soprano
Christopher Lowrey, L’umana fragilità/countertenor
Teresa Wakim, Guinone/La Fortuna/soprano
João Fernandez, Nettuno/bass
Owen McIntosh, Giove/Pissandro, tenor
Krista River, Ericlea/mezzo-soprano
Jonas Budris, Anfinomo/sailors/tenor
Ulysses Thomas, Antinoo/bass-baritone



Boston Baroque Website


Please click here for a Culturekiosque book review of Mark Ringer's "Opera’s First Master: The Musical Dramas of Claudio Monteverdi."


Detailed schedule information:
7:30 pm

Contact: New England Conservatory
Jordan Hall
30 Gainsborough Street
Boston, Massachusetts
Tel: (1) 617 987 86 00

Maija Kovalevska (Mimi) and&nbsp;Joseph Calleja (Rodolfo)in Puccini’s: <EM>La Bohème </EM>
Maija Kovalevska (Mimi) and Joseph Calleja (Rodolfo)
in Puccini's: La Bohème
La Bohème : By Giacomo Puccini
NEW YORK  •  Metropolitan Opera  •  14 January - 18 April 2014
 
 

Giacomo Puccini: La Bohème
Libretto: Giuseppe Giacosa and Luigi Illica after the novel by Henry Murger Scènes de la vie La Bohème
Sung in Italian with Met titles in Italian, English, German and Spanish

Production: Franco Zeffirelli
Set Designer: Franco Zeffirelli
Costume Designer: Peter J. Hall
Lighting Designer: Gil Wechsler

Stefano Ranzani, conductor

Cast
 
Mimì: Maija Kovalevska
Musetta: Irina Lungu
Rodolfo: Joseph Calleja
Marcello: Alexey Markov
Schaunard: Joshua Hopkins
Colline: Christian Van Horn
Benoit/Alcindoro: Donald Maxwell



Metropolitan Opera Website



Detailed schedule information:
8:00 pm

Contact: Metropolitan Opera
Lincoln Center
New York, New York  10023

Tel: (1) 212 362 60 00

Madama Butterfly : By Giacomo Puccini
NEW YORK  •  Metropolitan Opera  •  4 April - 9 May 2014
 
 
Giacomo Puccini: Madama Butterfly
Libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa
After the play by David Belasco
Adapated from a short story by John Luther Long

Sung in Italian with Met surtitles in Italian, English, Spanish, German

Production: Anthony Minghella
Director and Choreographer: Carolyn Choa
Set Designer: Michael Levine
Costume Designer: Han Feng
Lighting Designer: Peter Mumford
Puppetry: Blind Summit Theatre

Marco Armiliato, conductor

Cast

Cio-Cio-San: Kristine Opolais
Suzuki: Maria Zifchak
Pinkerton: James Valenti
Sharpless: Dwayne Croft



Metropolitan Opera Website



Detailed schedule information:
7:30 pm

Contact: Metropolitan Opera
Lincoln Center
New York, New York  10023

Tel: (1) 212 362 60 00

Events in Pop Culture and Cinema

Nickel Creek
Nickel Creek
Nickel Creek: With special guest The Secret Sisters
NEW YORK  •  Beacon Theatre  •  29 April 2014
 

The Grammy Award–winning, multi-platinum selling trio Nickel Creek—Chris Thile (mandolin/vocals), Sara Watkins (fiddle/vocals), and Sean Watkins (guitar/vocals)—officially reunites for the first time since its 2007 self-described “indefinite hiatus” with a new album, A Dotted Line, on 1 April 2014. The band is now on tour in support of the Eric Valentine–produced album this spring and summer, with shows in New York, Boston, Washington, Chicago, Nashville, and Los Angeles, as well as at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival and Newport Folk Festival.

Nickel Creek
With special guest The Secret Sisters



Beacon Theatre Website



Detailed schedule information:
8:00 pm

Contact: Beacon Theatre
2124 Broadway
New York, NY
Tel: (1) 212 496 70 70

Joanne Shenandoah (Oneida) From the Haudenosaunee Nation of central New York State, Shenandoah blends Iroquois songs with traditional and western instruments. A leader in the genre of contemporary Native music, her music addresses everything from Native American struggles and issues, to love, relationships, and the environment. Photo by James MahshiePhoto courtesy of National Museum of the American Indian
Joanne Shenandoah (Oneida)
From the Haudenosaunee Nation of central New York State, Shenandoah blends Iroquois songs with traditional and western instruments. A leader in the genre of contemporary Native music, her music addresses everything from Native American struggles and issues, to love, relationships, and the environment.
Photo by James Mahshie
Photo courtesy of National Museum of the American Indian
Our Lives: Contemporary Life and Identities
WASHINGTON, D.C.  •  National Museum of the American Indian  •  21 September 2004 - 1 January 2015
 
Our Lives reveals how residents of eight Native communities—the Campo Band of Kumeyaay Indians (California, USA), the urban Indian community of Chicago (Illinois, USA), Yakama Nation (Washington State, USA), Igloolik (Nunavut, Canada), Kahnawake (Quebec, Canada), Saint-Laurent Metis (Manitoba, Canada), Kalinago (Carib Territory, Dominica), and the Pamunkey Tribe (Virginia, USA)—live in the 21st century. Through their stories, visitors learn about the deliberate and often difficult choices indigenous people make in order to survive economically, save their languages from extinction, preserve their cultural integrity, and keep their traditional arts alive.

The main section of Our Lives centers on various layers of identity. For Native people, identity—who you are, how you dress, what you think, where you fit in, and how you see yourself in the world—has been shaped by language, place, community membership, social and political consciousness, and customs and beliefs.

National Museum of the American Indian Web Site


Contact: Tel: (1) 202 633 10 00

PterosaurPhoto: Don Emmert
Pterosaur
Photo: Don Emmert
Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs
NEW YORK  •  American Museum of Natural History  •  5 April 2014 - 4 January 2015
 

Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs, a new exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History explores the world of these extraordinary flying reptiles, the first back-boned animals to evolve powered flight. As long as dinosaurs walked the Earth, pterosaurs—ranging from the size of a sparrow to that of a small airplane—ruled the skies until they went extinct 66 million years ago.

The largest exhibition ever presented in the United States about these animals, Pterosaurs highlights the latest research by Museum scientists and leading paleontologists around the world. It also features rare pterosaur fossils from Germany, the United States, and Brazil as well as casts, life-size models, videos, and interactive exhibits that immerse visitors in the mechanics of pterosaur flight.

The exhibition is overseen by Curator Mark Norell, chair of the Division of Paleontology, who conducts pterosaur research in Romania, China, and Mongolia, with Co-curator Alexander Kellner, a Museum research associate and paleontologist at the Museu Nacional in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.



American Museum of Natural History Website


Contact: American Museum of Natural History
Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY
Tel: (1) 212-769 58 00

Question Bridge: Black Males
SAN FRANCISCO  •  Exploratorium  •  1 May 2013 - 1 May 2014
 

At this critical moment, when the United States has re-elected its first black man for president, there is still a prevailing negative bias against the black male in America. Question Bridge: Black Males is an innovative multimedia art project that seeks to widen understanding of the experiences of this population, breakdown misconceptions, and provide links to universal questions of identity.

Organized by artists Chris Johnson and Hank Willis Thomas, in collaboration with Bayeté Ross Smith and Kamal Sinclair, the five-channel video installation (and Official Selection of the 2012 Sundance Film Festival) offers a platform to represent and redefine black male identity in America, while simultaneously deconstructing stereotypes. The artists worked with 150 black men from twelve disparate cities across the United States in an effort to bridge economic, political, geographic, and generational divisions. These men engaged in a frank question-and-answer exchange around topics such as family, faith, manhood, and violence.

“How do you know when you become a man?” asks a young boy. “That is a deep question for such a young person!” exclaims one, expressing the surprise of many of the respondents. But their answers, thoughtful and candid, discuss accountability and responsibility, and often reveal more universal implications. “Manhood is, for each person, an individual quest.”

Presented in conjunction with 30 Americans, Question Bridge addresses questions of race, class, and identity in America and contributes to conversations about racial identity in art practice. According to the artists, through this dialogue, “‘Blackness’ ceases to be a simple, monochromatic concept.”

Question Bridge: Black Males Producers: Executive Producers Delroy Lindo, Deborah Willis, and Jesse Williams, Post-Production Producer Will Sylvester, and Supervising Story Producer Rosa White

Question Bridge is sponsored by Fellowship Open.



Exploratorium Website


Contact: Exploratorium
15/17 Pier
San Francisco, CA 94111
Tel: (1) 415 528 44 44

Raul Midón
NEW YORK  •  City Winery  •  27 April 2014
 
Singer-songwriter and guitarist Raul Midón, blind since birth in New Mexico, has released seven albums since 1999, including the hit studio productions State of Mind (Manhattan/EMI, 2005), A World Within a World (Manhattan/EMI, 2007) and Synthesis (Decca/Universal, 2009). Midón's most recent release is the captivating CD/DVD Invisible Chains – Live from NYC.

City Winery Website



Detailed schedule information:

8:00 pm

Contact: City Winery
155 Varick Street
(between Spring & Vandam Streets)
New York, NY

Tel: (1) 212 608 0555

Jason Maddy and&nbsp;John Vickery in <EM>RED</EM>
Jason Maddy and John Vickery in RED
Red: By John Logan
SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA  •  Lyceum Stage  •  29 March - 27 April 2014
 

Red is the sixth production of the company's 38th season by John Logan and directed by Sam Woodhouse, co-founder and artistic director of San Diego REP. The story is set in 1958 at a critical point in the career of the abstract impressionist painter, when Mark Rothko has been challenged to create a definitive work of art for the exclusive Four Seasons restaurant. He struggles with the threatening presence of a neophyte assistant, who represents a voice of a new generation of artists that questions Rothko's theories and label him a sell-out. Surrounded by massive black and red canvases that pulsate with color, the result is a battle between student and master in search of the highest art possible. This larger-than-life portrait of an angry of an angry and brilliant artistic mind is a fearless piece of work that dares to explain the mysteries of creation.

Red was written by John Logan who wrote the Academy Award-nominated screenplays for The Gladiator and "The Aviator." He won a Golden Globe for his film version with Tim Burton of the musical "Sweeney Todd." He also co-wrote the recently acclaimed James Bond film Skyfall and is slated to write the next two Bond films.

 



San Diego REPertory Theatre Website



Detailed schedule information:
7"00 pm

Contact: The Lyceum Stage
San Diego REPertory Theatre
79 Horton Plaza
San Diego, CA. 9210-6144
Tel: (1) 619 544-10 00

<SPAN class=pie _extended="true">Serena Gili: Discipline Collection, 2012Cashmere top with golden fibre glass skirt.Courtesy of Serena Gili.Photo: Kirill Kuletski for i-D Online.</SPAN><BR _extended="true">
Serena Gili: Discipline Collection, 2012
Cashmere top with golden fibre glass skirt.
Courtesy of Serena Gili.
Photo: Kirill Kuletski for i-D Online.

A Queen Within: Adorned Archetypes, Fashion and Chess
SAINT LOUIS, MISSOURI  •  The World Chess Hall of Fame  •  19 October 2013 - 18 April 2014
 
 

In the game of chess, the queen is considered the most powerful, and often, the most unpredictable piece. The queen, both in chess and as an archetype, embodies tradition yet possesses the creative freedom to redefine the rules established by a patriarchal system. The World Chess Hall of Fame presents A Queen Within: Adorned Archetypes, Fashion and Chess, an exhibition that uses photography, video, sculpture, storytelling, and some of the rarest garments in the world to explore the queen and her influence.

Evolving from the weakest to the strongest piece, the queen wields exceptional power in chess. It is thought that this privileging of the queen on the board is an indication of her increasingly powerful status in medieval and early modern European society. In A Queen Within, nine Jungian archetypes or "personalities" of the queen are used to examine the relationships between power, risk-taking, as well as feminine roles in society.

Produced by an international team of thought-leaders, curators, fashion insiders, and chess players, the exhibition focuses on how storytelling as well as the various archetypes of the queen have captured the imagination of innovative fashion designers.

Objects From the Following Designers are on view: Alexander McQueen, Anrealage, Chan Luu, Charlie Le Mindu, Gianfranco Ferre, Gucci, Hideki Seo, Henrik Vibskov, Hussein Chalayan, Iris Schieferstein, Iris Van Herpen, Jean Paul Gaultier, Jordan Askill, Josefin Arnell, Keta Gutmane, Koji Arai, Maiko Takeda, Maison Martin Margiela, Minju Kim, Noritaka Tatehana, Octavia Xiaozi Yang, Pam Hogg, Rein Vollenga, Rejina Pyo, Ryohei Kawanishi, Sandra Backlund, Serena Gili, Shaun Leane and and Daphne Guinness, Tabitha Osler, Viktor & Rolf, and Writtenafterwards.



The World Chess Hall of Fame Website


Contact: The World Chess Hall of Fame
4652 Maryland Avenue
St. Louis, Missouri 63108
Tel: (1) 314 367 92 43

Bryan Cranston as Lyndon B. Johnsonin <EM>All the Way</EM> &nbsp;
Bryan Cranston as Lyndon B. Johnson
in All the Way  
All the Way: By Robert Schenkkan
NEW YORK  •  Neil Simon Theatre  •  6 March - 30 December 2014
 
 

Robert Schenkkan: All the Way
Drected by Bill Rauch

All the Way is a new play about a pivotal moment in American history. This drama takes audiences behind the doors of the Oval Office and inside the first years of Lyndon B. Johnson's (Bryan Cranston) presidency, and his fight to pass a landmark civil rights bill. The play stars Bryan Cranston as LBJ, Michael McKean as J. Edgar Hoover, and Brandon J. Dirden as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Other cast members:

 Susannah Schulman (Lurleen Wallace), J. Bernard Calloway (Ralph Abernathy), James Eckhouse (Robert McNamara), Michael McKean (J. Edgar Hoover), Steve Vinovich (Rep. Emanuel Celler), Peter Jay Fernandez (Roy Wilkins), Ethan Phillips (Stanley Levison), Bill Timoney (Senator Karl Mundt), Betsy Aidem (Lady Bird Johnson), Christopher Gurr (Senator Strom Thurmond), Roslyn Ruff (Coretta Scott King), Eric Lenox Abrams (Bob Moses), Richard Poe (Senator Everett Dirksen), John McMartin (Senator Richard Russell); (seated from left) Robert Petkoff (Senator Hubert Humphrey), Christopher Liam Moore (Walter Jenkins), playwright Robert Schenkkan, Bryan Cranston (LBJ), director Bill Rauch, Brandon J. Dirden (Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.), and William Jackson Harper (Stokely Carmichael).



Neil Simon Theatre Website


Contact: Neil Simon Theatre
250 W 52nd Street
New York, NY 10019
Tel: (1) 212 757 86 46

American Cool
WASHINGTON, DC  •  National Portrait Gallery  •  7 February - 7 September 2014
 
 
American Cool features 100 photographs of icons who have contributed an original artistic vision to American culture and are symbolic figures of their time.

Cool is an original American concept and remains a global obsession. In the early 1940s, legendary jazz saxophonist Lester Young brought this central African American sensibility into the modern vernacular. Cool became a password in bohemian life connoting a balanced state of mind, a dynamic mode of performance and a certain stylish stoicism. A cool person always seems to have the situation under control with a signature style.

Cool has been embodied in jazz musicians such as Miles Davis and Billie Holiday; in actors such as Johnny Depp, Faye Dunaway and Robert Mitchum; and in singers such as Elvis Presley, Patti Smith and Jay-Z. They emerged from a variety of fields: art, music, film, sports comedy, literature and even political activism. “American Cool” is the zeitgeist taking embodied form.



The National Portrait Gallery Website


Contact: The National Portrait Gallery
Donald W. Reynolds Center for American Art and Portraiture
Eighth and F streets N.W., Washington, D.C.

Tel: (1) 202 633 10 00

Del McCoury Band
NEW YORK  •  City Winery  •  16 - 17 April 2014
 
 
Del McCoury Band with Special Guest David Grisman

City Winery Website



Detailed schedule information:
8:00 pm

Contact: City Winery
155 Varick Street
(between Spring & Vandam Streets)
New York, NY

Tel: (1) 212 608 0555

Fishing for Wives: By Edward Sakamoto
NEW YORK  •  Clurman Theatre  •  10 - 27 April 2014
 
 

Edward Sakamoto:  Fishing for Wives

Pan Asian Repertory Theatre in New York presents it’s premiere of Fishing for Wives, a comic battle of the sexes written by Edward Sakamoto and directed by Ron Nakahara. The play is a vintage romantic comedy of errors: Nishi, tired of life as a single fisherman, sends for a picture bride from his native Japan but includes a photo of his handsome friend in his place.  The bride arrives and falls in love- with the wrong bachelor- setting off a comic rivalry and a final surprise turn of events, colorfully visualized against the backdrop of the Hawaiian islands.

The cast of Fishing for Wives stars Hawaii natives Bobby Foley (TV’s Hawaii Five-0, Girls) and Viet Vo (TV’s Lost) as hapless bachelors Nishi and Aoki, who are joined by Akiko Hiroshima (last seen at Pan Asian in Tea), Allison Hiroto, and Kiyo Takami (Kiyohime in 2013’s production of Dojoji).

Sets: Sheryl Liu
Lighting: Marie Yokoyama
Costumes: Carol Pelletier
Sound design: Kevin Brouder



Pan Asian Repertory Theatre



Detailed schedule information:
7:30 pm

Contact: Clurman Theatre at Theatre Row
410 West 42nd Street
between 9th and Dyer
New York, NY
Tel: (1) 212 239 62 00

Greed: A Musical for Our Times: By Michael Roberts
NEW YORK  •  New World Stages/Stage 2  •  written by Michael Roberts and directed by Christopher Scott with music direction & arrangements by Steven Gross
 
 

Michael Roberts: Greed: A Musical for Our Times
Directed by Christopher Scott
Musical direction & arrangements by Steven Gross

What do Jamie Dimon, Lance Armstrong, Pope Francis and Bernie Madoff have in common?  They all appear in Greed: A Musical for Our Times... Greed's musical comedy targets range from Ponzi schemes to the not so subtle sales pitches of retirement planners and mortgage bundlers, with numbers like “A Little Juice,” “Inside Information,” “I'll Cheat On My Taxes,” and “The Ballad of Jamie Dimon,” Greed takes aim at the obvious, and not so obvious, targets.

Michael Roberts is the author, composer and lyricist of the musicals Golf: The Musical and The Fartiste, which played Off-Broadway during the 2011-12 season and won the 2006 FringeNYC Best Musical Award.

Tony Award nominee Stephanie D'Abruzzo (Avenue Q), will head the cast, along with Julia Burrows, Neal Mayer and James Donegan.




Detailed schedule information:
8:00 pm

Contact: New World Stages/Stage 2
340 West 50th Street
New York, NY
Tel: (1) 212 230 62 00

Julio Iglesias : Singer-songwriter Julio Iglesias
NEW YORK  •  Carnegie Hall  •  24 April 2014
 
 
Singer-songwriter Julio Iglesias

Carnegie Hall Website



Detailed schedule information:
9:00 pm

Contact: Carnegie Hall
881 Seventh Avenue at 57th Street
New York, NY 10019
Tel: (1) 212 247 78 00

Nantucket Daffodil Festival
NANTUCKET, MASSACHUSETTS  •  Nantucket Island  •  25 - 27 April 2014
 
 

From early April to mid-May, over three million daffodils of every color, shape and size bloom throughout the island. The bountiful blossoms--in shades of yellow, orange white and pale pink -- grace roadsides, gardens, window boxes and shop windows. The Chamber-sponsored Daffodil Festival, in its 40th year, is a full-scale jubilee of winter's thaw featuring an Antique Car Parade, Tailgate Picnic, and the Children's Beach Family Picnic, as well as a Daffy Hat, Dog and Children's Parade.

The Antique Car Parade is the Festival's signature event, showcasing over 100 daffodil-bedecked vintage cars (pre-registration required for participation). After winding through town, the cars make their way across the island to the village of  'Sconset where participants join residents and visitors for the Tailgate Picnic.



Contact: Nantucket Island
Nantucket, MA 02554


Nickel Creek
Nickel Creek
Nickel Creek
NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE  •  Ryman Auditorium  •  18 - 19 April 2014
 
 
Nickel Creek

Ryman Auditorium Website


Contact: Ryman Auditorium
116 Fifth Avenue North
Nashville, TN 37219
Tel: (1) 615 889 30 60

Ronnie Spector
NEW YORK  •  City Winery  •  19 April 2014
 
 
Ronnie Spector performs "Beyond the Beehive"

City Winery Website



Detailed schedule information:
8:00 pm

Contact: City Winery
155 Varick Street
(between Spring & Vandam Streets)
New York, NY

Tel: (1) 212 608 0555

The James Hunter Six
NEW YORK  •  City Winery  •  20 April 2014
 
 
The James Hunter Six

City Winery Website



Detailed schedule information:
8:00 pm

Contact: City Winery
155 Varick Street
(between Spring & Vandam Streets)
New York, NY

Tel: (1) 212 608 0555

<EM>The Power of Poison</EM>American Museum of Natural History
The Power of Poison
American Museum of Natural History
The Power of Poison
NEW YORK  •  American Museum of Natural History  •  16 November 2013 - 10 August 2014
 
 

The astonishing variety of evolutionary adaptations among toxic plants and animals is at the heart of The Power of Poison,  an exhibition that also examines humans’ attempts to understand poisons’ potency, how the science of detecting poison developed, and how researchers today use venoms and other natural toxins to develop new medical treatments.

Visitors will:

Encounter some of history’s most puzzling poisoning cases and take part in a live theater presentation to help unravel a real-world case of poisoning

Discover extraordinary organisms using poison in their daily struggle to survive while walking through a re-created Colombian forest

Examine an “enchanted” book that resembles an ancient botanical volume and watch animations of well-known poisonous plant species “magically” appear with each turn of the page

See several tales and legends re-created in life-size dioramas, including the trio of witches dropping gruesome ingredients into a boiling cauldron from a famous scene in William Shakespeare’s Macbeth

Consider some of history’s most notorious poisoners and poisonings that still puzzle today, including Cleopatra’s death and Napoleon’s decline.



American Museum of Natural History Website


Contact: American Museum of Natural History
Central Park West at 79th Street
New York, NY 10024-5192

Tel: (1) 212 769 51 00



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