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Travel Tip: Art and Archaeology in United States
Japanís Modern Divide: The Photographs of Hiroshi Hamaya and Kansuke Yamamoto



Hiroshi Hamaya: <EM>Man in a Traditional Minoboshi Raincoat, Niigata Prefecture</EM>, 1956Gelatin silver printThe J. Paul Getty Museum, 2009.34.18.© Keisuke Katano
Hiroshi Hamaya: Man in a Traditional Minoboshi Raincoat, Niigata Prefecture, 1956
Gelatin silver print
The J. Paul Getty Museum, 2009.34.18.
© Keisuke Katano
Japanís Modern Divide: The Photographs of Hiroshi Hamaya and Kansuke Yamamoto
UNITED STATES
LOS ANGELES  •  J. Paul Getty Museum, Getty Center  •  Ongoing
 

This exhibition presents the work of two 20th-century photographers, Hiroshi Hamaya and Kansuke Yamamoto, who represent important but alternate paths in Japanese photography.

The Taishō era (1912Ė1926) was a brief but dynamic period in Japanís history that ushered in a modern state with increased industrialization, shifting political parties, radical fashions, and liberal thinking in many areas. However, this era of heightened experimentation ended with the arrival of an international depression, the promotion of ultranationalism, and the countryís entry into what would become the Greater East Asia War.

Reflecting both sides of this dramatic transition, two disparate representations of modern Japan are displayed together in Japanís Modern Divide: The Photographs of Hiroshi Hamaya and Kansuke Yamamoto, on view at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Getty Center. Curated by Judith Keller, senior curator of photographs, and Amanda Maddox, assistant curator of photographs, the exhibition includes photographs from the Getty Museumís permanent collection, the Toyko Metropolitan Museum of Photography, the estate of Hiroshi Hamaya, the Nagoya City Art Museum, and other public and private lenders.

Born during the Taishō era, photographers Hiroshi Hamaya (1915Ė1999) and Kansuke Yamamoto (1914Ė1987) responded to Japanís rapidly-changing sociopolitical climate in very different ways. While Hamaya focused inward toward rural life on the back coast of Japan, Yamamoto found inspiration in the art of European Surrealists. As the ebb and flow of Japanís political, economic, and social structures persisted across the 20th century, Hamaya and Yamamoto continued to pursue divergent paths, thus embodying both sides of modern Japanese life: the traditional and the Western, the rural and the urban, the oriental and the occidental.



J. Paul Getty Museum Website


Contact: J. Paul Getty Museum
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90049-1687
Tel: (1) 310 440 73 00

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