TRAVEL CALENDAR
Go to:
About CK •  Art • Chef • Dance • Jazz • Klassik • Nouveau • Opera • Travel Calendar
Log In • Sign Up
You are in:  Home > Travel Calendar > Pop Culture and Cinema in United States   •  send page to a friend




Travel Tip: Pop Culture and Cinema in United States
Frogs: A Chorus of Colors



Phantasmal Poison Frog • Epipedobates tricolor • A chemical from this frog is about 200 times more potent than morphine in laboratory tests. Researchers are hoping to mimic its effects to develop medicines to block pain. • © Taran Grant/AMNH • Photo courtesy of American Museum of Natural History
Phantasmal Poison Frog
Epipedobates tricolor
A chemical from this frog is about 200 times more potent than morphine in laboratory tests. Researchers are hoping to mimic its effects to develop medicines to block pain.
© Taran Grant/AMNH
Photo courtesy of American Museum of Natural History
Frogs: A Chorus of Colors
UNITED STATES
NEW YORK  •  American Museum of Natural History  •  Ongoing
 
 
This exhibition introduces visitors to the colorful and richly diverse world of frogs. More than 200 live frogs, from the tiny golden mantella frog to the enormous African bullfrog are shown in their re-created habitats, complete with rock ledges, live plants, and waterfalls. Featuring approximately 25 species from such countries as Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, China, Columbia, Kenya, Madagascar, Mexico, Russia, Suriname, the United States, Uruguay, Venezuela, and Vietnam, the exhibition explores the evolution and biology of these popular amphibians. Interactive stations throughout the exhibition invite visitors to activate recorded frog calls, view videos of frogs in action, and test their knowledge about frogs.

The centerpiece of the exhibition is a dart poison frog vivarium that houses 75 frogs, including dyeing poison forgs, blue poison frogs, green and black poison frogs, and golden poison frogs. These dart poison frogs, found in Central and South America from Costa Rica to Southern Brazil, are so named because some native South Americans make posion darts by rubbing the tip of the dart in the poisonous mucus of the frog's skin. This mucus, which is made toxic by poisons in the frog's invertebrate prey, is incredibly potent---a single golden poison frog contains enough poison to kill 20,000 mice or 10 people. A web camera enables virtual visitors across the globe to watch the daily lives and routine behaviour of the frogs.

American Museum of Natural History Web Site


Contact: Tel: (1) 212 769 58 00

More Pop Culture and Cinema Travel Listings:

More United States Travel Listings: